Lee's Sharpshooters: Or, The Forefront of Battle. A Story of Southern Valor that Never Has Been Told

Front Cover
Tunnah & Pittard, printers, 1899 - Spotsylvania Court House, Battle of, Va., 1864 - 488 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
"A story of Mississippi sharpshooters, by ... Capt. Robert F. Ward, interpolated by an exhaustive description of the battles of the Wilderness and Spottslvania Court House by the correspondent of the London Morning herald": pages [359]-475.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
17
II
25
III
41
IV
57
V
75
VI
87
VIII
97
IX
101
XV
187
XVI
199
XVII
207
XVIII
219
XIX
229
XXI
241
XXII
255
XXIII
271

X
119
XII
135
XIII
145
XIV
157
XXIV
283
XXVI
303
XXVII
331

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 350 - Their shivered swords are red with rust, Their plumed heads are bowed; Their haughty banner, trailed in dust, Is now their martial shroud. And plenteous funeral tears have washed The red stains from each brow, And the proud forms, by battle gashed, Are free from anguish now. The...
Page 273 - You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you His blessing and protection. With an increasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you an affectionate farewell. RE LEE, General.
Page 140 - IT is a sultry day ; the sun has drunk The dew that lay upon the morning grass ; There is no rustling in the lofty elm That canopies my dwelling, and its shade Scarce cools me. All is silent, save the faint And interrupted murmur of the bee, Settling on the sick flowers, and then again Instantly on the wing.
Page 265 - All that the mind would shrink from of excesses ; All that the body perpetrates of bad ; All that we read, hear, dream, of man's distresses ; All that the devil would do if run stark mad ; All that defies the worst which pen expresses ; All by which hell is peopled, or as sad As hell — mere mortals who their power abuse — Was here (as heretofore and since) let loose.
Page 349 - The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo ; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On Fame's eternal camping ground Their silent tents are spread, And glory guards, with solemn round, The bivouac of the dead.
Page 275 - tis gory, Yet 'tis wreathed around with glory, And 'twill live in song and story, Though its folds are in the dust : For its fame on brightest pages> Penned by poets and by sages, Shall go sounding down the ages — Furl its folds though now we must. Furl that Banner, softly, slowly ! Treat it gently — it is holy — For it droops above the dead. Touch it not — unfold it never, Let it droop there, furled forever, For its people's hopes are dead...
Page 350 - No braying horn nor screaming fife At dawn shall call to arms. Their shivered swords are red with rust, Their plumed heads are bowed; Their haughty banner, trailed in dust, Is now their martial shroud. And plenteous funeral tears have washed The red stains from each brow, And the proud forms, by battle gashed, Are free from anguish now.
Page 249 - Firm-paced and slow, a horrid front they form, Still as the breeze, but dreadful as the storm. Low murmuring sounds along their banners fly, Revenge or death...
Page 273 - After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the survivors of so many hard-fought battles, who have remained steadfast to the last...
Page 349 - No rumor of the foe's advance Now swells upon the wind ; No troubled thought at midnight haunts Of loved ones left behind ; No vision of the morrow's strife The warrior's dream alarms ; No braying horn nor screaming fife At dawn shall call to arms.

Bibliographic information