The Kaiser’s Merchant Ships in World War I

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McFarland, Jul 11, 2001 - History - 256 pages
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Germany’s merchant Marine fleet—the second largest in the world prior to 1914—played an unintended but decisive role in that nation’s defeat in World War I. There were those ships that went to war for the Kaiser on the high seas, those that stayed at home or otherwise played no significant part in the conflict, and those which were commandeered (mostly in 1917 and by the United States) and used against Germany. This is a well illustrated history, both practical and romantic, of the association each ship may have had with famous people and events of the war, and of the fates of the ships that comprised that fleet.
 

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Contents

Background
7
Overview
16
The Leadership
23
Inventory
39
The Ships That Went Overseas to War
43
The Great Kaiser
45
Cap Trafalgar
56
Kronprinz Wilhelm
65
The Heavyweights
148
Presidents and Cities
168
Lesser Players at War
175
PART FOUR
187
The StayatHomes
189
The Second Wave
199
Möwe
201
Eagles Meteors and Wolves
208

Prinz Eitel Friedrich
81
Batavia and Berlin
91
The Troopships of America
97
The Crown Princess
99
The Litigation
116
Kaiser Wilhelm II
126
The Barbarossa Class
130
PART SIX
215
The Last Gasp
217
Appendix
223
Notes
237
Index
247
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

William Lowell Putnam served as vice chairman of the Association of Maximum Service Telecasters, among his multitude of other professional credits. He is the sole trustee of the Lowell Observatory and lives in Flagstaff, Arizona.

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