History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century, Volume 1

Front Cover
G. P. Putnam's sons, 1902 - Deism - 469 pages
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Contents

The process implies inconsis tency
9
Strained interpretation
10
And hasty rejection of
11
The extralogical influences utilitarian
12
Social
13
Imaginative 15 The romantic regret
15
Its true meaning
16
Summary
17
The Cartesian Phtlosophy 18 Metaphysical perplexities
19
Why interesting
20
Theology and philosophy
21
Descartes provisional doubt
22
Mathematical analogy
23
The soul and Ood
25
Its historical origin
26
Beality undisooverable
27
Dogmatism and scepticism
29
Spinozas philosophy
30
The euthanasia of theology
32
The English Criticism 34 The English philosophers
34
His cosmological theory
36
37 Sceptical tendency
37
Berkeley on materialism
38
His idealism
40
His theory of causation
42
David Hume
43
Humes problem
45
Limits of thought
46
Perception involves afiction
47
Mode of escape from his
48
Illustration of its meaning
56
to ethical theories 292
61
Further statement of theory
62
Opposition to scepticism
69
Authority and reason
75
Christianity and philosophy
81
CONSTRUCTIVE DEISM
91
The need of a revelation
97
Tolands philosophy
106
Clarke and Wollaston
119
SECTION PAGE
123
Clarkes position and influence
129
Force of his argument
137
Christianity and progress
143
John Conybeares reply
149
The Decay of Deism
163
Freewill 121
165
Sceptical conclusion
169
His conclusion174
175
Atheists and divines181
182
The point of view
188
SECTION PAGE 19 Rise of criticism
189
Charles Blount
194
Significance of his position
200
Allegories
202
Direction of assault
203
Collins and Bentley
204
Bentleys Phileleutherus Lip siensis
205
Argument from various read ings
207
Swifts attack upon Collins
209
The argument from misan thropy
210
William Whiston
212
Whistons Essay towards Re storing the Text Ac
213
Collinss Discourse of the Grounds and Reasons
214
Allegorical meanings
215
Aim of the book
216
Replies to Collins
217
Chandlers replies to Collins
218
Nature of the argument
221
His general weakness
222
The argument upon Daniel
223
Conclusion of Chandler
224
Sherlocks Six Discourses
225
Sykess reply to Collins
226
Newtons Dissertations
227
The Argument from Miracles 45 Miracles allegorised
228
Mystical interpretation
233
SBCTIOX PAGE 50 Smalbrokes reply
234
Smalbrokes incapacity
236
Weakness of both sides
237
Changed character of contro versy
238
Zachary Pearce
239
His argument against Woolston
241
Sherlocks Trial of the Wit nesses
242
Plan of the book
243
Sherlocks argument
245
Peter Annet
247
West on the Resurrection
248
Lyttelton on St Paul
250
His brutality and force
251
Position of the argument
252
The Historical Argument 66 Conyers Middleton
253
His Letter from Rome
255
Nature of argument
256
Waterlands reply to Tindal
257
His brutal theology
258
Development of the contro versy
270
Logical position reached
271
Typical thinkers
273
Note upon Collinss Discourse of Freethinking
274
Ontology and revelation 122
283
281
287
SECTION MGK 14 The deification of conscience
293
The probationary state
294
Butler and evolution
295
The waste of nature
296
Necessity and fatalism
297
Butlers solution of the diffi cilty
298
Its inadequacy
299
His final position
300
The Analogy and atheism
301
Butler on revealed religion
302
Unsatisfactory method of his argument
303
Final position
304
Weakness of bis argument
305
Its force
307
DAVID HUME 1 Imperfect appreciation of Hume
309
Neglect of his writings
310
Completeness of his arguments
311
Kants scheme of theological arguments
312
The a posteriori arguments
313
Necessity of facing them
314
Humes general reply to on tologists
315
Humes theory of causation 50
316
The Dialogues their gene ral scheme
317
Their bearing on the ontologi cal argument
318
The cosmological argument
319
The physicotheological ar gument
320
Its two meanings
321
Final causes and evolution
324
Antiquity of argument
325
Its contradiction of experi ence
326
The most probable hypo thesis
329
Essay on a Providence and a Future State
330
Application to Butler
333
The historical argument
334
Origin of theism
336
The argument from mirncles
337
First mode of evasion
340
Force of Humes argument
341
His love of paradox
353
THE LATER THEOLOGY
372
Scientific influences
379
Nature of his position 385 15 Soame Jenynss View of
386
Bishop Hornes remarks
392
Campbells answer to Hume
398
Unsatisfactory conclusions
404
Paley and his School sKCTIOX PAGE 35 Cambridge theologians
405
E Laws Considerations on Theory of Religion
406
W Paley
407
His Natural Theology
408
Paleys conception of it
409
His anthropomorphism
410
Special instances
411
The fatal gap
413
Paleys Evidences
414
Their application to the ques tion
416
Force of his argument
417
Assumption involved
418
Paleys sincerity
419
His latitudinarianism
420
The Subscription Contro versy
421
Rise of Unitarianism 54 Blackburnes Confessional
423
His own views 56 The Feathers petition
424
Heys lectures 58 Laxity of his views 59 General indifference VI The Unitarians 60 Taylors Ben Mordeoai 61 Its tendency 62 Prices Arianism 63 Jose...
425
Priestleys Historical Me thod
434
Want of true historical sense
435
And philosophical knowledge
436
Horsleys advantage
437
The main point of dispute
438
Priestleys strong point
439
Conclusion of controversy
440
Gilbert Wakefield
441
His political troubles
442
Edward Evanson
443
The canon 201
444
SemiRationalism
445
The Infidels 81 Gibbon
446
His defects as an historian
447
His attack on Christianity
449
Inversion of historical argu ment
451
Force of his argument
453
Bishop Watson
454
Watsons theology
456
His reply to Gibbon
457
Paines Age of Reason
458
His common sense
460
His view of the Bible
461
The revival of Deism
462
Paines morality
463
Replies to Paine
464

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Page 447 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Page 213 - Butter and honey shall he eat, That he may know to refuse the evil, and choose the good. For before the child shall know to refuse the evil, and choose the good, The land that thou abhorrest shall be forsaken of both her kings.
Page 219 - Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord ; and he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse.
Page 318 - Nothing is demonstrable, unless the contrary implies a contradiction. Nothing, that is distinctly conceivable, implies a contradiction. Whatever we conceive as existent, we can also conceive as non-existent. There is no being, therefore, whose non-existence implies a contradiction.
Page 176 - So that, upon the whole, we may conclude, that the Christian Religion not only was at first attended with miracles, but even at this day cannot be believed by any reasonable person without one. Mere reason is insufficient to convince us of its veracity : And whoever is moved by Faith to assent to it, is conscious of a continued miracle in his own person, which subverts all the principles of his understanding, and gives him a determination to believe what is most contrary to custom and experience.
Page 76 - Take away this persecuting, burning, cursing, damning of men for not subscribing to the words of men as the words of God ; require of Christians only to believe Christ, and to call no man master but Him only...
Page 337 - The whole is a riddle, an enigma, an inexplicable mystery. Doubt, uncertainty, suspense of judgment, appear the only result of our most accurate scrutiny concerning this subject.
Page 46 - Let us fix our attention out of ourselves as much as possible, let us chase our imagination to the heavens or to the utmost limits of the universe: we never really advance a step beyond ourselves, nor can conceive any kind of existence but those perceptions which have appeared in that narrow compass.
Page 460 - After the sermon was ended, I went into the garden, and as I was going down the garden steps (for I perfectly recollect the spot) I revolted at the recollection of what I had heard, and thought to myself that it was making God Almighty act like a passionate man, that killed his son, when he could not revenge himself any other way; and as I was sure a man would be hanged that did such a thing, I could not see for what purpose they preached such sermons.
Page 199 - That an English writer of the time of Henry III. should have been able to put off on his countrymen as a compendium of pure English law a treatise of which the entire form and a third of the contents were directly borrowed from the Corpus Juris...

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