The Bear and the Dragon

Front Cover
Penguin, Aug 1, 2001 - Fiction - 1152 pages
29 Reviews
President Jack Ryan faces a world crisis unlike any he has ever known in Tom Clancy's extraordinary #1 New York Times bestseller.

A high-level assassination attempt in Russia has the newly elected Ryan sending his most trusted eyes and earsincluding antiterrorism specialist John Clarkto Moscow, for he fears the worst is yet to come. And he’s right. The attempt has left the already unstable Russia vulnerable to ambitious forces in China eager to fulfill their destinyand change the face of the world as we know it...
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
5
3 stars
16
2 stars
2
1 star
2

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gregdehler - LibraryThing

As someone who loved Clancy's first novels, I was highly disappointed in this and gave up after about 100 pages or so. All the characters seemed to be the same person, lots of sex, and some of the political statements got in the way of the story. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

I’m not a big Clancy fan - he tends to be a bit too macho and his political views a bit too Right-leaning for me. But this tome (at over 1,000 pages) includes inside dirt on the fascinating stuff that ... Read full review

All 10 reviews »

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

A little more than thirty years ago Tom Clancy was a Maryland insurance broker with a passion for naval history. Years before, he had been an English major at Baltimore’s Loyola College and had always dreamed of writing a novel. His first effort, The Hunt for Red October—the first of the phenomenally successful Jack Ryan novels—sold briskly as a result of rave reviews, then catapulted onto the New York Times bestseller list after President Reagan pronounced it “the perfect yarn.” From that day forward, Clancy established himself as an undisputed master at blending exceptional realism and authenticity, intricate plotting, and razor-sharp suspense. He passed away in October 2013.

Bibliographic information