Table of Consular Grievances, 1843-1846

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- Hawaii - 120 pages
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Page 96 - Protection is hereby secured to the persons of all the people, together with their lands, their building lots, and all their property, and nothing whatever shall be taken from any individual, except by express provision of the laws.
Page 97 - ... kingdom, and to him belonged all the land from one end of the Islands to the other, though it was not his own private property. It belonged to the chiefs and people in common, of whom Kamehameha I was the head, and had the management of the landed property. Wherefore, there was not formerly, and is not now any person who could or can convey away the smallest portion of land without the consent of the one who had, or has the direction of the kingdom.
Page 96 - The origin of the present government, and system of polity is as follows. KAMEHAMEHA I. was the founder of the kingdom, and to him belonged all the land from one end of the islands to the other, though it was not his own private property. It belonged to the chiefs and people in common, of whom Kamehameha I. was the head, and had the management of the landed property. Wherefore, there...
Page 21 - America at and such other parts as shall be nearer thereto than to the residence of any other Consul or Vice Consul of the United States within the same allegiance...
Page 97 - It is hereby clearly proclaimed that lands and fixed property upon them can never be sold at auction, neither can they be permanently transferred. They cannot even be leased for years without consent of King and Premier. This kind of property . . . can never be seized for debt, for the Government has never relinquished its right in the soil.
Page 97 - ... and fixed property upon them can never be sold at auction, neither can they be permanently transferred. They cannot even be leased for years without the consent of the King and Premier. This kind of property therefore can never be seized for debt, for the Government has never relinquished its right to the soil. But nevertheless, if a man have no personal estate, the land and fixed property upon it may be sold at auction on this condition that no person can be the purchaser except a native born...
Page 6 - ... of the pretences under which the contempt was indulged in, and the contumacy sought to be covered up)— I have, I say, sir, to deliver to you this message from your commander-in-chief, the President of the United States, to wit: "When the communication, bearing the seal of the Department of State, and addressed 'to his excellency the minister of foreign relations of the Mexican republic...
Page 24 - ... same rights and possessions they now enjoy. All provisions and supplies of every kind, furnished by the inhabitants for the use of the United States ships and soldiers, will be paid for at fair rates; and no private property will be taken for public use without just compensation at the moment. JOHN D. SLOAT, Commander-in-chief of the United States naval forceS in the Pacific ocean. D. GENERAL ORDER. FLAG SHIP SAVANNAH, July 7, 1846. We are about to land on the Territory of Mexico, with whom the...
Page 2 - March 15, 1851. Mr. Wyllie alleging reasons of State, asked M. Perrin's permission to give him a perusal of the instructions framed in April and September 1849, for Mr. Jarves and Mr. Judd, during their mission to the Governments of France, Great Britain, and the United States, and accordingly gave a reading of each of these documents. M. Perrin, in his turn, read a
Page 28 - States, it is a thing unheard of to affix to foreigners who had taken the oath of allegiance to the United States, the stigma of not being eligible as jurors in the causes of foreigners who had not taken that oath.

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