The International Journal of Psycho-analysis

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Ernest Jones
Routledge, 1927 - Electronic journals
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Page 461 - There is a healthy suspicion growing that men analysts have been led to adopt an unduly phallo-centric view of the problems in question, the importance of the female organs being correspondingly underestimated.
Page 143 - I hesitate to give it expression) that for women the level of what is ethically normal is different from what it is in men. Their super-ego is never so inexorable, so impersonal, so independent of its emotional origins as we require it to be in men.
Page 144 - Their super-ego is never so inexorable, so impersonal, so independent of its emotional origins as we require it to be in men. Character-traits which critics of every epoch have brought up against women— that they show less sense of justice than men, that they are less ready to submit to the great exigencies of life, that they are more often influenced in their judgments by feelings of affection or hostility...
Page 143 - ... it is literally smashed to pieces by the shock of threatened castration. Its libidinal cathexes are abandoned, desexualized and in part sublimated; its objects are incorporated into the ego, where they form the nucleus of the super-ego and give that new structure its characteristic qualities. In normal, or...
Page 40 - It is never to be thought of as an end in itself but only as a means to an end. It...
Page 144 - Character-traits which critics of every epoch have brought up against women— that they show less sense of justice than men, that they are less ready to submit to the great exigencies of life, that they are more often influenced in their judgments by feelings of affection or hostility— all these would be amply accounted for by the modification in the formation of their super-ego which we have inferred above.
Page 139 - She makes her judgement and her decision in a flash. She has seen it and knows that she is without it and wants to have it.
Page 140 - After a woman has become aware of the wound to her narcissism, she develops, like a scar, a sense of inferiority. When she has passed beyond her first attempt at explaining her lack of a penis as being a punishment personal to herself and has realized that that sexual character is a universal one, she begins to share the contempt felt by men for a sex which is the lesser in so important a respect, and, at least in holding that opinion, insists on being like a man.
Page 139 - It is not until later, when some threat of castration has obtained a hold upon him, that the observation becomes important to him: if he then recollects or repeats it, it arouses...
Page 412 - and here we have that higher nature, in this ego-ideal or super-ego, the representative of our relation to our parents. When we were little children, we knew these higher natures, we admired them and feared them; and later we took them into ourselves.

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