Dune

Front Cover
Penguin, 2005 - Fiction - 528 pages
3084 Reviews
Here is the novel that will be forever considered a triumph of the imagination. Set on the desert planet Arrakis, Dune is the story of the boy Paul Atreides, who would become the mysterious man known as Muad'Dib. He would avenge the traitorous plot against his noble family--and would bring to fruition humankind's most ancient and unattainable dream.

A stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism and politics, Dune won the first Nebula Award, shared the Hugo Award, and formed the basis of what it undoubtedly the grandest epic in science fiction.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GrlIntrrptdRdng - LibraryThing

Dune drops you into a universe that is hard to make sense of at first, but as you read along the plot and world become more interesting and you understand things better. The world building is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kristykay22 - LibraryThing

I always think of the Dune series as the only real books I remember my dad reading when I was a kid. Now that he has retired, my dad is reading all the time (yay, pops!) and when he loaned me his Dune ... Read full review

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Contents

DUNE
1
MUADDIB
197
THE PROPHET
353
The Ecology of Dune
477
The Religion of Dune
484
Report on Bene Gesserit Motives and Purposes
492
The Almanak enAshraf Selected Excerpts of the Noble Houses
495
Terminology of the Imperium
497
Afterword
521
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Frank Herbert was born in Tacoma, Washington, and educated at the University of Washington, Seattle. He worked a wide variety of jobs--including TV cameraman, radio commentator, oyster diver, jungle survival instructor, lay analyst, creative writing teacher, reporter and editor of several West Coast newspapers--before becoming a full-time writer. He died in 1986.

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