Texas and the Gulf of Mexico: Or, Yachting in the New World, Volume 1

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J. Murray, 1844 - New Orleans (La.)
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Page 113 - A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian. Legg'd like a man! and his fins like arms! Warm, o
Page 182 - THE power of Armies is a visible thing, Formal, and circumscribed in time and space ; But who the limits of that power shall trace Which a brave People into light can bring Or hide, at will, — for freedom combating By just revenge inflamed...
Page 240 - The conflict in the breastwork lasted but a few moments ; many of the troops encountered hand to hand, and not having the advantage of bayonets on our side, our riflemen used their pieces as war clubs, breaking many of them off at the breech. The rout commenced at half-past four, and the pursuit by the main army continued until twilight.
Page 231 - General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, and other military chieftains, have, by force of arms, overthrown the federal institutions of Mexico, and dissolved the social compact which existed between Texas and the other members of the Mexican confederacy; now the good people of Texas, availing themselves of their natural rights, SOLEMNLY DECLARE 1st.
Page 232 - That they hold it to be their right during the disorganization of the Federal system, and the reign of despotism, to withdraw from the Union, to establish an independent government...
Page 264 - It is the mynd that maketh good or ill, That maketh wretch or happie, rich or poore; For some, that hath abundance at his will, Hath not enough, but wants in greatest store, And other, that hath litle...
Page 222 - Texas, and no cruisers along the coast. I gave it as my decided opinion, that the inevitable consequence of sending an armed force to this country would be war. I stated that there was a sound and correct moral principle in the people of Texas that was abundantly sufficient to restrain or put down all turbulent or seditious movements, but that this moral principle could not and would not unite with any armed force sent against this country ; on the contrary, it would resist and repel it, and ought...
Page 218 - Coahuila provisionally, under the especial guarantee of being made a state of the Mexican confederation as soon as it possessed the necessary elements. That law and the federal constitution gave to Texas a specific political existence, and vested in its inhabitants special and defined rights, which can only be relinquished by the people of Texas acting for themselves as a unity and not as a part of Coahuila, for the reason that the union with Coahuila was limited, and only gave power to the state...
Page 218 - As such it had a separate and distinct local organization. It was one of the unities that composed the general mass of the nation, and as such participated in the war of the revolution, and was represented in the Constituent Congress of Mexico that formed the Constitution of 1824. This Constituent Congress, so far from destroying this unity, expressly recognized and confirmed it by the law of May 7th, 1824, which united Texas with Cosihmla provisionally, under the especial guarantee of being made...
Page 219 - ... existence, and vested in its inhabitants special and defined rights, which can only be relinquished by the people of Texas, acting for themselves as a unity, and not as a part of Coahuila, for the reason that the union with Coahuila was limited, and only gave power to the State of Coahuila and Texas to govern Texas for the time being, but always subject to the vested rights of Texas. The State, therefore, cannot relinquish those vested rights, by agreeing to the change of government, or by any...

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