Beyond the Black Box: The Forensics of Airplane Crashes

Front Cover
JHU Press, 2008 - Health & Fitness - 393 pages
4 Reviews

The black box is orange—and there are actually two of them. They house the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder, instruments vital to airplane crash analyses.

But accident investigators cannot rely on the black boxes alone. Beginning with the 1931 Fokker F-10A crash that killed legendary football coach Knute Rockne, this fascinating book provides a behind-the-scenes look at plane wreck investigations. Professor George Bibel shows how forensic experts, scientists, and engineers analyze factors like impact, debris, loading, fire patterns, metallurgy, fracture, crash testing, and human tolerances to determine why planes fall from the sky—and how the information gleaned from accident reconstruction is incorporated into aircraft design and operation to keep commercial aviation as safe as possible.

 

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Review: Beyond the Black Box: The Forensics of Airplane Crashes

User Review  - Goodreads

Not a bad basic overview of the physics of flight Read full review

Review: Beyond the Black Box: The Forensics of Airplane Crashes

User Review  - Goodreads

Although's its author's prose is dry and sometimes repetitive, this detailed study of the history and physics of airplane crashes taught me a lot. Recommended for air disaster geeks. Read full review

Contents

The Crash Investigation Process
1
How Planes Often Crash
12
InFlight Breakup
58
Pressure Explosive Decompression and Burst Balloons
87
Jet Propulsion Burst Engines and Reliability
168
Metal Fatigue Bending 777s and Paper Clips
219
Combustion Fire and Explosion
251
Crash Testing
292
Human Tolerances to G Loads and Crash Forces
336
Notes
365
References
375
Index
387
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

George Bibel, a former NASA summer faculty fellow, is a professor of mechanical engineering at the School of Engineering and Mines, University of North Dakota. He recently completed the Air Line Pilots Association Advanced Accident Investigation Course.

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