Ice Blink: The Tragic Fate of Sir John Franklin's Lost Polar Expedition

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2001 - History - 256 pages
Absorbing.artfully narrat[es] a possible course of events in the expedition's demise, based on the one official note and bits of debris (including evidence of cannibalism) found by searchers sent to look for Franklin in the 1850s. Adventure readers will flock to this fine regaling of the enduring mystery surrounding the best-known disaster in Arctic exploration.--Booklist

""A great Victorian adventure story rediscovered and re-presented for a more enquiring time.""--The Scotsman

""A vivid, sometimes harrowing chronicle of miscalculation and overweening Victorian pride in untried technology.a work of great compassion.""--The Australian

It has been called the greatest disaster in the history of polar exploration. Led by Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin, two state-of-the-art ships and 128 hand-picked men----the best and the brightest of the British empire----sailed from Greenland on July 12, 1845 in search of the elusive Northwest Passage. Fourteen days later, they were spotted for the last time by two whalers in Baffin Bay. What happened to these ships----and to the 129 men on board----has remained one of the most enduring mysteries in the annals of exploration. Drawing upon original research, Scott Cookman provides an unforgettable account of the ill-fated Franklin expedition, vividly reconstructing the lives of those touched by the voyage and its disaster. But, more importantly, he suggests a human culprit and presents a terrifying new explanation for what triggered the deaths of Franklin and all 128 of his men. This is a remarkable and shocking historical account of true-life suspense and intrigue.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
3
3 stars
1
2 stars
2
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - arubabookwoman - www.librarything.com

This is a non-fiction account of Franklin's last polar expedition, and its tragic failure. Cookman makes the case that the major cause of the failure and loss of life was the poor food, particularly ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CasaBooks - LibraryThing

Heard about this particular book from a client who had a family member searching by air for any remains/artifacts from this expedition. It's of great interest and I have other books on the subject ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2001)

Author Scott Cookman was born in 1952. He wrote two outdoor adventure histories and wrote both cooking features and how-to advice articles for Field and Stream magazine. He died in 2007.

Bibliographic information