The Story of a Bad Boy

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A.L. Burt, 1913 - Adventure stories - 278 pages
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User Review  - datrappert - LibraryThing

Aldrich's semi-autobiographical story is memorable for its portrayal of a boy's life in pre-Civil War New England. The book's fictional Rivermouth is actually Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The writing is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - raizel - LibraryThing

Charming story of the adventures of a young boy growing up in New England; one particular adventure ends tragically. Read full review

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Page 115 - No" to a challenge to fight, say " No" if you can, — only take care you make it clear to yourselves why you say " No." It's a proof of the highest courage, if done from true Christian motives. It's quite right and justifiable, if done from a simple aversion to physical pain and danger. But don't say "No" because you fear a licking, and say or think...
Page 116 - It's a proof of the highest courage, if done from true Christian motives. It's quite right and justifiable, if done from a simple aversion to physical pain and danger. But don't say " No " because you fear a licking, and say or think it's because you fear God, for that's neither Christian nor honest. And if you do fight, fight it out ; and don't give in while you can stand and see.
Page 69 - I go to meeting, joining my grandfather, who does not appear to be any relation to me this day, and Miss Abigail, in the porch. Our minister holds out very little hope to any of us of being saved. Convinced that I am a lost creature, in common with the human family, I return home behind my guardians at a snail's pace. We have a dead-cold dinner.
Page 63 - ... her way in with a clothes-pin. I raised the cross-bow, I repeat. Twang ! went the whipcord ; but, alas ! instead of hitting the apple, ^ the arrow flew right into Pepper Whitcomb's mouth, which happened to be open at the time, and destroyed my aim. I shall never be able to banish that awful mement from my memory.

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