Picture Bride: A Novel

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University of Washington Press, 1987 - Fiction - 216 pages
2 Reviews
Carrying a photograph of the man she is to marry but has yet to meet, young Hana Omiya arrives in San Francisco, California, in 1917, one of several hundred Japanese "picture brides" whose arranged marriages brought them to America in the early 1900s.

Her story is intertwined with others: her husband, Taro Takeda, an Oakland shopkeeper; Kiku and her husband Henry, who reject demeaning city work to become farmers; Dr. Kaneda, a respected community leader who is destroyed by the adopted land he loves. All are caught up in the cruel turmoil of World War II, when West Coast Japanese Americans are uprooted from their homes and imprisoned in desert detention camps. Although tragedy strikes each of them, the same strength that brought her to America enable Hana to survive.

"Yoshiko Uchida is the foremost Japanese American woman writer of our time. Picture Bride is a tender, painful, exquisitely written novel...a very serious and important book." - Barry Gifford

"A moving tribute...A rare insight into the hearts and minds of Japanese immigrant women and the important role they played in the establishment and survival of ethnic family and community life in America." - Judy Yung,San Francisco Chronicle

"With insight, pathos, and deep understanding, the author, in her graceful, dignified way, dares to expose Hana as a long-suffering, independent, assertive woman who is frustrated and stifled as she struggles to adjust to a hostile culture that is blind to her sense of values." -Western American Literature

 

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User Review  - pennsylady - LibraryThing

1917 Hana Omiya has left Japan and arrived in San Francisco, California. In the early 20th century, she is one of many Japanese "picture brides", facing an arranged marriage to a groom she knew only ... Read full review

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Such a shitty book

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About the author (1987)

Botan (pseud. Supa Sirising) is a native of Bangkok, born of Chinese parents. She has published more than ten novels, most of which reflect women’s and children’s perspectives. Susan Fulop Kepner has been translating Thai literature for more than 30 years, including A Child of the Northeast by Kampoon Boontawee and the anthology A Lioness in Bloom.

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