Bacchae, Volumes 1-2

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Clarendon Press, 1893 - Bacchantes - 166 pages
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User Review  - DubiousDisciple - LibraryThing

For those who don’t recognize the title, this ancient Greek theater piece is about the god Dionysus, god of wine. It was first performed in Athens, in 405 BC. And for those who still don’t catch the ... Read full review

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Page 43 - Though the mills of God grind slowly, yet they grind exceeding small; Though with patience he stands waiting, with exactness grinds he all.
Page 47 - Aeneas ; semperque relinqui sola sibi, semper longam incomitata videtur ire viam et Tyrios deserta quaerere terra: Eumenidum veluti demens videt agmina Pentheus et solem geminum et duplices se ostendere Thebas, 470 aut Agamemnonius scaenis agitatus Orestes armatam facibus matrem et serpentibus atris cum fugit, ultricesque sedent in limine Dirae.
Page 30 - Lectos, argentum : tollas licet. In manicis et Compedibus saevo te sub custode tenebo. Ipse deus, simul atque volam, me solvet.
Page 39 - The metaphor is so exceedingly obvious, as well as beautiful, that one may wonder, that it has not been more frequently used. Virgil very elegantly intimates, rather than expresses, the image : " Ecce levis summo de vertice visus luli Fundere lumen apex ; tractuque innoxia molli Lambere flamma comas, et circum tempora pasci." ^En. II. 682. And more boldly of vEtna darting out flames from its top : " Attollitque globOs flammarum, et sidera lambit.
Page 59 - At the moment of throwing the spear the loop was pulled violently, by means of which the strap, in being unwound, conveyed to the spear a rotating movement, similar to that of the missiles of our rifled guns.
Page 33 - All verbs expressing the exercise of the senses or denoting any functional state or process have the inflexions of the middle voice, either throughout or in the future tense...
Page 14 - Athens became the godhead and the centre of the widest and the best worship known to the best spirits in the best days of the best community of Hellas " — " the tutelary god and great inspirer of ^Eschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes.
Page 5 - As to his parentage the myths are various, the most rational being that he was the son of Zeus and Semele, daughter of Cadmus, king of Thebes.
Page 58 - Parthisns clapped their hands with shouts of joy and the attendants, at the command of the king, seated Sillakes, while Jason handed over to one of the members of the chorus the dress of Pentheus, and, laying hold of the head of Crassus, and, putting on the air of a bacchant, he sung these verses with great enthusiasm : — We bring from a mountain A young one new killed to the house, A fortunate prey.

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