Philosophical Magazine

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis., 1857 - Science
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Contents

Forbe9s Chemical Examination of and Remarks
91
Mr J Elliot on two new Forms of the Stereoscope intended
104
The Rev S Haughtons Notes on Mineralogy No IV
116
Holzmann on the Vibration of Polarized Light in the Plane
125
Geological Society
145
Meteorological Observations for December 1856
151
Prof Stokes on the Polarization of Diffracted Light
159
Mr E Foote on the Heat in the Suns Rays
168
Prof Sedgwicks Remarks on a passage in the Presidents
176
Dr Atkinsons Chemical Notices from Foreign Journals
183
The Rev G Salmon on the Problem of the I nand circum
190
Cambridge Philosophical Society
215
On the Telescopic Stereoscope by Mr J Elliot
218
APRIL
225
Mr T S Hunt on the Chemical Composition of the Waters
239
Mr A Cayley on a Problem in the Partition of Numbers
245
Prof Riess on Electric Pauses
261
The Rev G Salmon on the Problem of the Inandcircum
267
Proceedings of the Royal Society
276
Researches on the Electricity of the Air and the Earth and
296
On an Apparatus to determine the Solubility of Salts at High
304
Mr J N Hearder on a new Instrument for Registering a rapid
324
The Rev G Salmon on the Problem of the Inandcircum
337
Prof Miller on the Application of Elementary Geometry to Cry
345
Prof Tyndall on Foam and Hail
352
Forbes on the Chemical Composition of the Silurian
365
Proceedings of the Royal Society
373
Experiments on the Artificial Formation of the Hydrated Car
388
Mr J P Nichol on Parallel Lines
412
Mr A Cayley on the Summation of a certain Factorial
419
Prof Schonbein on the Connexion of Catalytic Phenomena
440
Proceedings of the Royal Society
452
NUMBER XCJULY 1857
1
Page 138 line 5 from bottom for sin 6 read cos 6
6
Mr W S Jevons on the Cirrous form of Cloud 22
23
Mr W Lupton on Spherical Geometry 35
36
The Rev S Haughtons Notes on Mineralogy No VI
47
Note on theOptical Properties of Magnetic Bodies by M Verdet 78
78
Prof Clausius on the Nature of the Motion which we call
108
W Vincent on the Formation of Sulphide of Aluminium 127
127
Mr A Cayley on the Equipotential Curve + C 142
143
On the Composition of Beudantite by M Rammelsberg 159
159
Messrs Calvert and Johnson on the Chemical Changes which
165
Sir W Snow Harriss Researches in Statical Electricity 176
178
Mr F Guthrie on the Preparation of the Double Ethers 186
186
Mr H Medlock on the Reciprocal Action of Metals and
202
Mr J P Joule on Heat and the Constitution of Elastic Fluids 211
211
Messrs W H Perkin and B F Duppa on the Action of Bro
217
Prof Callan on the Induction Apparatus 323
323
Mr J Bridge on the Gyroscope 340
340
Dr Woods on the Time required by Compounds for Decompo
346
Prof Knoblauch on the Influence of Metals uponKadiant Heat 356
356
Sir W R Hamilton on the Calculation of the Numerical Values
375
Prof Dove on the Electrical Light 383
383
On Demidovite a new species of Mineral from Nijne Taguil
397
Dr Gladstone on the Colour of Salts in Solution each consti
418
Mr A Cayleys Demonstration of Sir W R Hamiltons
427
Prof Potter on the Principle of Nicols Rhomb and on some
452
On a new Stereoscopic Phenomenon by M A Cima 480
480
Prof Roscoe on the influence of Light upon Chlorine 504
505
Prof Faraday on the Experimental Relations of Gold and other
512
Mr A Cayleys Solution of a Question in the Theory
539
On a new Polarizer of Iceland Spar Experiment on Fluor
552

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page iv - Address delivered at the Anniversary Meeting of the Geological Society of London, on the 15th of February, 1856, by John William Hamilton, Esq., President of the Society.
Page 232 - That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance, through a vacunm, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity, that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it.
Page 200 - The explanation of all phenomena of electro-magnetic attraction or repulsion, and of electro-magnetic induction, is to be looked for simply in the inertia and pressure of the matter of which the motions constitute heat. Whether this matter is or is not electricity, whether it is a continuous fluid interpermeating the spaces between molecular nuclei, or is itself molecularly grouped ; or whether all matter is continuous, and molecular heterogeneousness consists in finite vortical or other relative...
Page 239 - But let us not admit the destruction or creation of force without clear and constant proof. Just as the chemist owes all the perfection of his science to his dependence on the certainty of gravitation applied by the balance, so may the physical philosopher expect to find the greatest security and the utmost aid in the principle of the conservation of force. All that we have that is good and safe, as the steam-engine, the...
Page 211 - The magnetic electrical machine enables us to convert mechanical power into heat by means of the electric currents which are induced by it. And I have little doubt that, by interposing an electromagnetic engine in the circuit of a battery, a diminution of the heat evolved per equivalent of chemical change would be the consequence, and this in proportion to the mechanical power obtained*.
Page 402 - Its development of color both in the reflected and transmitted rays ; because of the state of tenuity and division which it permitted with the preservation of its integrity as a metallic body : because of its supposed simplicity of character, and because known phenomena appeared to indicate that a mere variation in the size of its particles gave rise to a variety of resultt'.nt colors.
Page 213 - ... conceived greatest in the last, the particles have a motion round their own axes with different velocities, the particles of elastic fluids moving with the greatest quickness ;. and that in ethereal substances the particles move round their own axes, and separate from each other, penetrating in right lines through space.
Page 239 - I do not resist the search for them, for no one can do harm, but only good, who works with an earnest and truthful spirit in such a direction. But let us not admit the destruction or creation of force without clear and constant proof.
Page 227 - ... conversion. If any hypothesis, more or less trustworthy on other accounts, is insufficient in expressing it or incompatible with it, the place of deficiency or opposition should be marked as the most important for examination, for there lies the hope of a discovery of new laws or a new condition of force. The deficiency should never be accepted as satisfactory, but be remembered and used as a stimulant to further inquiry ; for conversions of force may here be hoped for. Suppositions may be accepted...
Page 60 - Helmholtz's galvanometer, with or without modification. The time of vibration of the suspended magnet, and the efficiency of the copper damper, will be so arranged, that during the electric pulse the suspended magnet will turn from its position of equilibrium into a position of maximum deflection, and will fall back to rest in its position of equilibrium. The possibility of fulfilling these conditions is obvious from the form of the curve I have found to represent the electric pulse. The observer...

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