Oppian's Halieuticks of the Nature of Fishes and Fishing of the Ancients

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Printed at the Theater, 1722 - Didactic poetry, Greek - 232 pages
 

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Page 68 - Fish, wandering, enter; then the bearded guide Warns the dull mate, and pricks his tender side : He knows the hint, nor at the treatment grieves, But hugs the advantage and the pain forgives.
Page 12 - The Sucking-fish beneath, with secret chains, Clung to the keel, the swiftest ship detains. The seamen run confused, no labour spared, Let fly the sheets, and hoist the topmost yard.
Page 13 - But, though the canvas bellies with the blast, And boisterous winds bend down the cracking mast, The bark stands firmly rooted in the sea, And will, unmov'd, nor winds nor waves obey ; Still, as when calms have flatted all the plain, And infant waves scarce wrinkle on the main.
Page 37 - ... moves on shining Volumes roll'd, The Foam all burning seems with wavy Gold. At length with equal Hast the Lovers meet, And strange Enjoyments slake their mutual Heat. She with wide-gaping Mouth the Spouse invites, Sucks in his head, and feels unknown Delights. When full Fruition has asswag'd Desire, Well-pleas'd the Bride will to her Home retire. Tir'd with the Strife the Serpent hies to Land, And leaves his Prints on all the furrow'd Sand; With anxious Fear seeks the close private Cleft, Where...
Page 36 - Mass, and careful hide In cranny'd Rocks, far from the washing Tide; There leaves the Furies of his noxious Teeth, And putrid Bags, the pois'nous Fund of Death. His Mate he calls with softly hissing Sounds; She joyful hears, and from the Ocean bounds. Swift as the bearded Arrow's Hast she flies, To her own Love, and meet the Serpent's Joys.
Page 5 - Tis one of the most admirable Secrets in Poetry to heighten small things by a noble manner of Expression; the meaner therefore any Subject is, the more capable it is of being adorned. As there is a regular Gradation of created Beings from Man down to the lowest Vegetable, the Naturalist seems to have the advantage in a Subject which is capable of being improved by borrowing it's Metaphors and Allusions from Objects of a superiour Nature.
Page 36 - Love, and meet the Serpent's Joys. At her approach, no more the Lover bears Odious Delay, nor sounding Waters fears. Onward he moves on shining Volumes roll'd, The Foam all burning seems with wavy Gold. At length with equal Hast the Lovers meet, And strange Enjoyments slake their mutual Heat. She with wide-gaping Mouth the Spouse invites, Sucks in his Head, and feels unknown Delights. When...
Page 19 - View the clear skies, and the pure welkin taste. But slow they cautious rise; and prudent fear The upper region of the wat'ry sphere. Backward they mount; and, as the stream o'erflows, Their convex shells to pressing floods oppose. Conscious they know that, should they forward move, O'erwhelming waves would sink them from above, Fill the void space, and with the rushing weight Force down th' inconstants to their former seat.
Page 90 - Insects hide, And goad with pois'nous Sting the tender Side. Vext with the puny Foe the Tunnies leap, Flounce on the Stream, and toss the mantling Deep, Ride o'er the foaming Seas, with Torture rave, 875 Bound into Air, and dash the smoking Wave.

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