The Fall of Constantinople 1453

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 13, 1990 - History - 256 pages
4 Reviews
This classic account shows how the fall of Constantinople in May 1453, after a siege of several weeks, came as a bitter shock to Western Christendom. The city's plight had been neglected, and negligible help was sent in this crisis. To the Turks, victory not only brought a new imperial capital, but guaranteed that their empire would last. To the Greeks, the conquest meant the end of the civilisation of Byzantium, and led to the exodus of scholars stimulating the tremendous expansion of Greek studies in the European Renaissance.
 

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User Review  - flmcgough - LibraryThing

A riveting account of the death of the last vestiges of the Roman Empire. We in the west don't understand just how much we owe to the Byzantine Empire and, as much as it pains me to say this, the fall ... Read full review

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User Review  - AlexTheHunn - LibraryThing

Runciman, one of the foremost authorities in this field, delivers a succinct account of the events of the final fall of Christian Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. He builds a foundation of the ... Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
22
VI
48
VII
60
VIII
73
IX
86
X
100
XI
112
XIII
133
XIV
145
XV
181
XVI
192
XVII
199
XVIII
205
XIX
236
XX
246

XII
123

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