The True Joy of Positive Living: An Autobiography

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Open Road Media, Sep 29, 2015 - Biography & Autobiography - 290 pages
The inspiring autobiography of the world-renowned minister and revered self-help giant whose positive thinking techniques have bettered the lives of millions of people

In his 95 years, Norman Vincent Peale made a profound difference. The son of a minister in Lynchburg, Ohio, he went on to preach the Lord’s word at Manhattan’s now-famous Marble Collegiate Church, where he served as pastor for 52 years and oversaw the church’s growth from 600 members to more than 5,000. He had a popular radio program for more than half a century, and appeared regularly on television. But perhaps his most lasting and powerful contribution was as author of the mega-bestseller The Power of Positive Thinking, the groundbreaking book that provided new guidance and hope and changed countless lives for generations throughout the world.
 
The True Joy of Positive Living is the inspiring true story of a humble man who started out poor in a small Midwestern town and rose to become one of the most famous and influential American figures of the 20th century—a man of God who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civilian honor, by President Ronald Reagan in 1984. Together with this wife Ruth, Dr. Peale founded the Peale Center for Christian Living and Guideposts magazine to ensure that his messages of self-confidence and the power of faith would continue to guide millions around the world even after his death. In his own uplifting words, Dr. Peale shares the story of a remarkable life lived with dignity and purpose. This stirring chronicle of an extraordinary soul—his unwavering service to the Lord and his remarkable development of the principles of positivity that had a life-altering effect on so many—will be an inspiration to all who read it.


 

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Peale was a great-grandson of Dr. Robert Fulton (1810-1897), who was my great uncle. Peale claims in this book that genealogy records show that our Fulton line is descended from Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamboat. That is not true. Our families are not related. Makes me wonder what else in this book is fiction! 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE Country Boy from Ohio
CHAPTER TWO Steamboats on the River
CHAPTER THREE Aluminum Salesman
CHAPTER FOUR Chapel Steps
CHAPTER FIVE Ink on the Fingers
CHAPTER SEVEN Brooklyn in the Roaring Twenties
CHAPTEREIGHT Upstate on a May
CHAPTER TEN Facing a Hard
CHAPTERELEVEN The Going Gets Tough
CHAPTER THIRTEEN The Message Goes Nationwide
Like People
CHAPTER TWENTY Health Energy and Long Life
Acknowledgments
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About the author (2015)

Dr. Norman Vincent Peale (1898–1993) was a Methodist minister, motivational speaker, and bestselling author renowned for promoting positive thinking as a means to happiness and success. He served as the pastor of the Marble Collegiate Church in Manhattan for fifty-two years and delivered sermons nationwide on his radio and television program The Art of Living for several decades. In 1952, he published his most influential and popular book, The Power of Positive Thinking, which has been translated into dozens of languages and has sold more than twenty million copies worldwidePeale espoused optimism and faith in numerous other books, including Why Some Positive Thinkers Get Positive ResultsThe Power of Positive Living, and The Positive Power of Jesus Christ.

Peale was the cofounder of the Horatio Alger Association, an organization committed to recognizing and fostering success in individuals who have overcome adversity. The association annually grants the memorial Norman Vincent Peale Award to a member who has made exceptional humanitarian contributions. With his wife, Ruth, the author also cofounded the Peale Center for Christian Living, as well as Guideposts—an   organization that encourages positive thinking and spirituality through its non-denominational ministry services and publications with a circulation of more than 4.5 million. In 1984, Ronald Reagan awarded Peale with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States’ highest civilian honor, for his contributions to theology.

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