The Worlds and I

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George H. Doran Company, 1918 - Journalists - 404 pages
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Page 90 - Laugh, and the world laughs with you; Weep, and you weep alone; For the sad old earth must borrow its mirth, But has trouble enough of its own.
Page 180 - THEY do me wrong who say I come no more When once I knock and fail to find you in; For every day I stand outside your door, And bid you wake and rise to fight and win. Wail not for precious chances passed away, Weep not for golden ages on the wane; Each night I burn the records of the day, At sunrise every soul is born again.
Page 180 - ... your door And bid you wake and rise, to fight and win. Wail not for precious chances passed away, Weep not for golden ages on the wane! Each night I burn the records of the day; At sunrise every soul is born again. Laugh like a boy at splendors that have sped, To vanished joys be blind and deaf and dumb; My judgments seal the dead past with its dead, But never bind a moment yet to come. Though deep in mire, wring not your hands and weep; I lend my arm to all who say,
Page 287 - FORTH from her land to mine she goes, The island maid, the island rose, Light of heart and bright of face : The daughter of a double race. Her islands here, in Southern sun, Shall mourn their Kaiulani gone, And I, in her dear banyan shade, Look vainly for my little maid. But our Scots islands far away Shall glitter with unwonted day, And cast for once their tempests by To smile in Kaiulani's eye.
Page 287 - Written in April to Kaiulani in the April of her age; and at Waikiki, within easy walk of Kaiulani's banyan! When she comes to my land and her father's, and the rain beats upon the window (as I fear it will), let her look at this page; it will be like a weed gathered and pressed at home; and she will remember her own islands, and the shadow of the mighty tree; and she will hear the peacocks screaming in the dusk and the wind blowing in the palms; and she will think of her father sitting there alone....
Page 415 - You are welcome to use the schoolhouse to debate all proper questions in, but such things as railroads and telegraphs are impossibilities and rank infidelity. There is nothing in the Word of God about them. If God had designed that His intelligent creatures should travel at the frightful speed of fifteen miles an hour, by steam, He would have clearly foretold it through His holy prophets. It is a device of Satan to lead immortal souls down to Hell.
Page 79 - RUST in thine own untried capacity * As thou wouldst trust in God Himself. Thy soul Is but an emanation from the whole. Thou dost not dream what forces lie in thee, Vast and unfathomed as the grandest sea. Thy silent mind o'er diamond caves may roll, Go seek them — but let pilot will control Those passions which thy favoring winds can be.
Page 44 - And what is so rare as a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days; Then Heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays; Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur, or see it glisten; Every clod feels a stir of might, •An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And...
Page 114 - And the dead whom once I knew?" "That was a dream," God smiled and said — "A dream that seemed to be true. There were no people, living or dead, There was no earth, and no sky o'erhead; There was only Myself — in you." "Why do I feel no fear," I asked, "Meeting You here this way?
Page 114 - Why do I feel no fear," I asked, "Meeting you here this way, For I have sinned I know full well, And is there heaven, and is there hell, And is this the judgment day?" "Nay, those were but dreams," the Great God said, "Dreams, that have ceased to be.

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