The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Aug 11, 2015 - History - 880 pages
10 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
The New York Times bestselling dazzling portrait of America on the verge of a nervous breakdown in the tumultuous political and economic times of the 1970s.

In January of 1973 Richard Nixon announced the end of the Vietnam War and prepared for a triumphant second term—until televised Watergate hearings revealed his White House as little better than a mafia den. The next president declared upon Nixon’s resignation “our long national nightmare is over”—but then congressional investigators exposed the CIA for assassinating foreign leaders. The collapse of the South Vietnamese government rendered moot the sacrifice of some 58,000 American lives. The economy was in tatters. And as Americans began thinking about their nation in a new way—as one more nation among nations, no more providential than any other—the pundits declared that from now on successful politicians would be the ones who honored this chastened new national mood.

Ronald Reagan never got the message. Which was why, when he announced his intention to challenge President Ford for the 1976 Republican nomination, those same pundits dismissed him—until, amazingly, it started to look like he just might win. He was inventing the new conservative political culture we know now, in which a vision of patriotism rooted in a sense of American limits was derailed in America’s Bicentennial year by the rise of the smiling politician from Hollywood. Against a backdrop of melodramas from the Arab oil embargo to Patty Hearst to the near-bankruptcy of America’s greatest city, The Invisible Bridge asks the question: what does it mean to believe in America? To wave a flag—or to reject the glibness of the flag wavers?
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
4
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nog - LibraryThing

I've knocked off a half star because of too much cultural history and the often ambiguity of what year a particular event is occurring in -- he sometimes skips around a bit in time. Otherwise, it's ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gayla.bassham - LibraryThing

This isn't quite the achievement that Nixonland is, and it's overly long -- seriously, I am the target audience for this book and even I grew impatient when I realized that its 800 pages only covered ... Read full review

Contents

Small and Suspicious Circles
1
Stories
24
Let Them Eat Brains
50
Executive Privilege
64
A Whale of a Good Cheerleader
78
Sam Ervin
94
John Dean
116
Nostalgia
145
Disease Disease Disease
420
New Right
443
Weimar Summer
468
The Nations Soul
515
Has the Gallup Poll Gone Bananas?
539
Negatives Are Positives
568
Not the Candidate of Kooks
594
Born Again
622

The Year Without Christmas Lights
174
That Thing Upstairs Isnt My Daughter
205
Hank Aaron
225
Here Comes the Pitch
241
Judging
259
There Used to Be a President
272
New Right?
286
Watergate Babies
326
Star
340
Governing
408
Always Shuck the Tamale
649
They Yearned to Believe
678
Bicentennial
708
Youre in the Catbird Seat
726
Dont Let Satan Have His Way
747
The End?
770
Acknowledgments
805
Index
811
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2015)

Rick Perlstein is the author of the New York Times bestseller The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan; Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America, a New York Times bestseller picked as one of the best nonfiction books of 2007 by over a dozen publications; and Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American Consensus, which won the 2001 Los Angeles Times Book Award for history and appeared on the best books of the year lists of The New York Times, The Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune. His essays and book reviews have been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, The Village Voice, and Slate, among others. A contributing editor and board member of In These Times magazine, he lives in Chicago.