Entering Jewish Prayer: A Guide to Personal Devotion and the Worship Service

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Schocken Books, 1994 - Religion - 350 pages
4 Reviews
"Learning about prayer is a way of entering the world of Jewish tradition, " Rabbi Hammer writes, and the Siddur - the Jewish prayerbook - is the best possible introduction into that world. In it, one is brought face-to-face with Judaism's central struggle for an understanding of God, human life, and the world. Mastery of the Siddur enables one to worship as a Jew and to grasp the essence of Judaism. Now, in this engaging and highly informative book, Rabbi Hammer provides an introduction to the liturgy of the Siddur. More than a "how-to" guide, Entering Jewish Prayer deals with the basic issues in prayer for the modern worshipper; the historical compilation of the Siddur; the orchestration of the daily, Sabbath, and festival prayers; the themes of special prayers, such as the Blessing After Meals and the Kaddish; and the essential experience of making prayer a vital part of one's life. For anyone who has ever felt lost or confused at a Jewish service, or anyone interested in an introduction to this facet of Jewish literacy, Entering Jewish Prayer provides a key to meaningful participation and spiritual growth.

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User Review  - fingerpost - LibraryThing

As a Gentile learning about Judaism I went into Hammer's book with two hopes. One was to learn what happens in a Jewish worship service so I would not feel totally lost when I eventually attend one ... Read full review

Review: Entering Jewish Prayer: A Guide to Personal Devotion and the Worship Service

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One of those books I will keep going back to. Read full review

Contents

What Is Prayer?
3
Using the Liturgy
27
Prayer in Early Israel
39
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

REUVEN HAMMER earned his rabbinical ordination and a doctorate in theology at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. He lives and teaches in Jerusalem.

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