Basic Writings of St. Thomas Aquinas: Volume 1

Front Cover
Hackett Pub., Sep 1, 1997 - Religion - 151 pages
2 Reviews
Includes the whole of the First Part of the Summa Theologica. Pegis’s revision and correction of the English Dominican Translation renders Aquinas’ technical terminology consistently as it conveys the directness and simplicity of Aquinas’ writing; the Introduction, notes, and index aim at giving the text its proper historical setting, and the reader the means of studying St. Thomas within that setting.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Basic Writings

User Review  - sologdin - Goodreads

the consummate scholar-priest-intellectual. hard not to like him, even though am rarely agreeing. Read full review

Review: Basic Writings

User Review  - Daniel Seifert - Goodreads

I continue to pick up and read St. Thomas periodically on numerous topics and questions primarily theological/ethical. This new find of a Anton C. Pegis first printing by Random House (1945) keeps me from having to go to the local university library to access this classic theological treasury. Read full review

About the author (1997)

Thomas Aquinas, the most noted philosopher of the Middle Ages, was born near Naples, Italy, to the Count of Aquino and Theodora of Naples. As a young man he determined, in spite of family opposition to enter the new Order of Saint Dominic. He did so in 1244. Thomas Aquinas was a fairly radical Aristotelian. He rejected any form of special illumination from God in ordinary intellectual knowledge. He stated that the soul is the form of the body, the body having no form independent of that provided by the soul itself. He held that the intellect was sufficient to abstract the form of a natural object from its sensory representations and thus the intellect was sufficient in itself for natural knowledge without God's special illumination. He rejected the Averroist notion that natural reason might lead individuals correctly to conclusions that would turn out false when one takes revealed doctrine into account. Aquinas wrote more than sixty important works. The Summa Theologica is considered his greatest work. It is the doctrinal foundation for all teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

Bibliographic information