My Arctic Journal: A Year Among Ice-fields and Eskimos

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Contemporary Publishing Company, 1893 - Arctic Regions - 240 pages
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Mrs. Peary's experiences at McCormick Bay, N.W. Greenland 1891-92. Includes observations on Eskimo customs.
 

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Review: My Arctic Journal: A Year Among Ice-Fields and Eskimos

User Review  - Pippa - Goodreads

I found this absolutely fascinating. Josephine was a brave woman and an interesting one, but she was very prejudiced against the 'Eskimos' (Inuit people) who she dismissed as ignorant savages. The book gives a picture of a complex and interesting woman and her difficult and lonely marriage. Read full review

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Page 225 - It was almost impossible for us to believe that we were standing upon the northern shore of Greenland as we gazed from the summit of this bronze cliff with the most brilliant sunshine all about us, with yellow poppies growing between the rocks around our feet, and a herd of musk-oxen in the valley behind us ... Down in that same valley I had found an old friend, a dandelion in bloom, and had seen the bullet-like flight and heard the energetic buzz of the bumble-bee.
Page 224 - ... to the crevasse-free level heights farther inland. Again setting my course to the north and northeast everything went smoothly until the 26th of June. On this day I was discouraged to see the land, which had been occasionally visible in the northwest, rise into view to the north, and then northeast. Then the northwest entrance of a Fjord came into view, and we could trace its course southeasterly just beyond the nearer mountains of the land north and northeast. I changed my course to east, when...
Page 230 - Not only was there no object to be seen, but in the entire sphere of vision there was no difference in intensity of light. My feet and snowshoes were sharp and clear as silhouettes, and I was sensible of contact with the snow at every step. Yet, as far as my eyes gave me evidence to the contrary, I was walking upon nothing. The space between my snowshoes was as light as the zenith. The opaque light which filled the sphere of vision might come from below as well as above. A curious mental as well...
Page 230 - I have found myself in cloudy weather traveling in gray space. Not only was there no object to be seen, but in the entire sphere of vision there was no difference in intensity of light. My feet and snow-shoes were sharp and clear as silhouettes, and I was sensible of contact with the snow at every step. Yet as far as my eyes gave me evidence to the contrary, I was walking upon nothing. The space between my snow-shoes was as light as the zenith. The opaque light which filled the sphere of vision might...
Page 4 - ... some hungry bear roaming along the shore and attracted by the unusual sight of the tent; yet she never gave a sign at the time of her fears, lest it should disturb me. The other picture is that of a scene perhaps a month or two later, when — myself still a cripple, but not entirely...
Page 224 - July, when we, after fiftyseven days of journeying over a barren waste of snow, stepped upon the rocks of a strange new land, lying red-brown in the sunlight, and dotted with snow-drifts heie and there.
Page 225 - Ocean half-way between the 8 ist and 82d parallels of latitude, was named Independence Bay in honor of the day, July 4th; the red-brown land beyond the fjord which had stopped our forward northward progress was called Heilprin Land ; and a still more distant land beyond the entrance of a second fjord, Melville Land. The enormous glacier at our right...
Page 236 - It was a part of my plan to obtain the material for my fur clothing and sleeping-bags in the Whale Sound region, and I was entirely successful in so doing. My boys shot the deer, the skins were stretched and dried in Redcliffe, I devised and cut the patterns for the suits and sleeping-bags, and the native women sewed them. As a result of my study of the Eskimo clothing and its use, I adopted it almost literatim, and my complete wardrobe consisted of a hooded deerskin coat weighing five and one-fourth...
Page 237 - F. to — 50, whether at rest, or walking, or pulling upon a sledge. The deerskin coat, with the trousers, footgear, and undershirt, weighed eleven and one-fourth pounds, or about the same as an ordinary winter business suit, including shoes, underwear, etc., but not the overcoat. In this costume, with the fur inside and the drawstrings at waist, wrists, knees, and face pulled tight, I have seated myself upon the great...
Page 230 - ... gave me evidence to the contrary, I was walking upon nothing. The space between my snow-shoes was as light as the zenith. The opaque light which filled the sphere of vision might come from below as well as above. A curious mental as well as physical strain resulted from this blindness with wide-open eyes, and sometimes we were obliged to stop and await a change. The wind is always blowing on the great ice-cap, sometimes with greater, sometimes with less violence, but the air is never quiet.

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