Peace and Bread in Time of War

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University of Illinois Press, 2002 - History - 159 pages
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Deals with the author's thoughts on pacifism. Turning away from the details of the war itself, the author relies on memory and introspection in this autobiographical portrayal of efforts to secure peace during the Great War.
 

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Loved the ideas in this story-another true story. Read full review

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Contents

At the Beginning of the Great War
3
The Neutral Conference plus the Ford Ship
17
President Wilsons Policies and the Womans Peace Party
30
A Review of Bread Rations and Womans Traditions
43
A Speculation on Bread Labor and War Slogans
53
After War Was Declared
62
Personal Reactions during War
76
In Europe during the Armistice
87
The Aftermath of War
102
A Food Challenge to the League of Nations
114
In Europe after Two Years of Peace
127
Afterword
141
Appendix
145
Index
149
Copyright

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Page xxvii - Victory would mean peace forced upon the loser, a victor's terms imposed upon the vanquished. It would be accepted in humiliation, under duress, at an intolerable sacrifice, and would leave a sting, a resentment, a bitter memory upon which terms of peace would rest, not permanently, but only as upon quicksand.

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About the author (2002)

Adams was the founder of Hull-House in Chicago and of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She was co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931.

Katherine Joslin is a professor of English and director of the program in American studies at Western Michigan University. She is the author of Edith Wharton.

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