The Philosophy of Mulla Sadra Shirazi

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1975 - Philosophy - 277 pages
Mulla Sadra Shirazi emerges as an original philosopher who had a sure understanding of his Greek and Islamic predecessors. He is worthy of study by scholars concerned with the development of Islamic philosophy because of his attempt to reconcile various currents of Islamic philosophical thought, particularly the peripatetic tradition of Ibn Arabi. Modern existentialists will be interested in his basic concern with the reality of existence and the unreality of essences or general notions.
 

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Contents

VII
27
VIII
31
IX
34
X
37
XI
45
XII
59
XIII
65
XIV
74
XXVII
174
XXVIII
180
XXIX
184
XXX
193
XXXI
195
XXXII
210
XXXIII
215
XXXIV
221

XV
82
XVI
94
XVII
108
XVIII
113
XIX
123
XX
125
XXI
128
XXII
133
XXIII
141
XXIV
146
XXV
167
XXVI
171
XXXV
225
XXXVI
232
XXXVII
233
XXXVIII
234
XXXIX
236
XL
247
XLI
251
XLII
257
XLIII
266
XLIV
271
XLV
276
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Page 5 - ... critical junctures in its history. He emphasizes the function of the procession of prophets in a vast cosmic journey of separation from God and eventual return to God. Sadr ad-Din Shirazi, also known as Mulla Sadra (1572-1641), was also indebted to the thought of Ibn 'Arabi, "but whereas Ibn 'Arabi's method of writing is not philosophical — he works by analogies and images rather than rational proofs, Sadra's method is out-and-out rational and philosophical. Indeed, just as Sadra condemns philosophy...

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