Self-instructor in the Art of Hair Work: Dressing Hair, Making Curls, Switches, Braids, and Hair Jewelry of Every Description

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Campbell, 1867 - Hairdressing - 276 pages
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Page 263 - ... general curiosity. He is perfectly well, his hair alone being affected by the copper, notwithstanding the precautions taken by him to protect it from the action of the metal. Chemical analysis shows that his hair contains a notable quantity of acetate of copper, and that it is to this circumstance that it owes its beautiful green color, which is most singular and remarkable.
Page 263 - ... appear in the street without immediately becoming the object of general curiosity. He is perfectly well, his hair alone being affected by the copper, notwithstanding the precautions taken by him to protect it from the action of the metal. Chemical analysis shows that his hair contains a notable...
Page 263 - The consumption of hair powder by the soldiers of George II was enormous. It was calculated that inasmuch as the military force of England and the colonies was, including cavalry, infantry, militia, and fencibles, 250,000, and each man used a pound of flour a week...
Page 4 - In the Clerk's Office of thu District Court of the United States, Tor the Northern District of Illinois.
Page 5 - ... intimidating, not the least because hair jewelry was seen as the province of professionals. Because of this, how-to instruction writers presented themselves as rebels. Mark Campbell, in his 1869 Self-Instructor, praised his bravery, for "[h]eretofore the Art of making these goods has been jealously guarded by a few dealers, who have accumulated fortunes, and would still retain it a profound secret but for the publication of this book.
Page 137 - All articles intended to be worn as jewelry, should, of course, be mounted with gold, and as this kind of work is not done in all jewelry establishments, I wish to say that my facilities for this branch of business is complete, and the work done is in the best possible manner. I can guarantee satisfaction in all cases, let the style desired be what it may.
Page 6 - Persons wishing to preserve and weave into lasting mementos, the hair of a deceased father, mother, sister, brother, or child, can also enjoy the inexpressible advantage and satisfaction of Jenowing that the material of their own handiwork is the actual hair of the
Page 263 - Bulletin de Therapeutique," the curious case of a worker in metals, who has wrought in copper only five months, and whose hair, which was lately white, is now of so decided a green that the man cannot appear in the street without immediately becoming the object of general curiosity. — He is perfectly well, his hair alone being affected by the copper, notwithstanding...
Page 14 - TAKE thirty -two strands, or any number that can be divided by four, twelve hairs in a strand, and sixty strands for usual size ; place them on table like pattern.

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