The Horse and the War

Front Cover
Country life, 1918 - Army horse - 130 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 110 - CANADIANS WITH arrows on their quarters and with numbers on their hoofs, With the trampling sound of twenty that re-echoes in the roofs, Low of crest and dull of coat, wan and wild of eye, Through our English village the Canadians go by. Shying at a passing cart, swerving from a car, Tossing up an anxious head to flaunt a snowy star, Racking at a Yankee gait, reaching at the rein, Twenty raw Canadians are tasting life again! Hollow-necked and hollow-flanked, lean of rib and hip, Strained and sick...
Page 11 - FROM THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE BRITISH FORCES IN FRANCE THE power of an army as a striking weapon depends on its mobility. Mobility is largely dependent on the suitability and fitness of animals for army work. I hope that this account of our army horses and mules will bring home to the peoples of the British Empire and the United States the wisdom of breeding animals for the two military virtues of hardiness and activity, and I would add that the best animals for army purposes are also the most...
Page 12 - ... meadowlands alight with crowns Of buttercups, where, for you, shapely trees Made spacious canopies. Now (day and night) unsheltered, in the mud You droop and ache ; While ruthless hands, for human purpose' sake, Fashion the complex tools which spill your blood And ours in rising flood.
Page 16 - In this con nection it will interest the reader to draw some comparison between requirements in the South African war and the vast demands on the world's horse population since August, 1914. For instance, I find the average strength in horses and mules in South Africa was approximately 150,000. I shall not be far off the mark if I say that the strength in 1916 of animals engaged with the British Armies is close on a million. There is a startling difference between the 70,000 horses which were bought...
Page 83 - ... few were probably showing signs of the daily grind and might have been qualifying for a rest and special feeding at the base hospitals or convalescent horse depots, but I did not see a case of debility or exhaustion still being retained at the front. And, of course, I saw many thousands of animals. Why this should be so is still something of a mystery to me. You will pass divisions either coming out of the line for rest or others going up. They seemed to be miles long as the guns, limbers, and...
Page 90 - ... businesses. Having attained dominance in international shipping and virtual parity in international air transportation, foreign companies are now making a concerted effort to gain entry into, then control of, the functions our members perform. I will go into these matters in somewhat more detail below, but I would like to make it clear from the outset that our Association does not oppose competition, either domestic or foreign, for intense competition is the overriding characteristic of our industry....
Page 39 - Certainty it is just as well that this should be so, since it is quite certain that no European country could have maintained its armies for a three years' war except by purchase abroad. The mystery is how America came to have so many horses available, and how they were broken and utilized over there. Apart from questions of conformation, weight and temperament, the real test of the war-horse must be one of...
Page 124 - Shire-bred type, the impressive cart-horse of fine size, weight and feathered legs fostered by the Shire Horse Society. One must be perfectly honest and say they have failed to stand the strain, exposure and hardship imposed by modern warfare. The fact is beyond all argument. It is the unanimous opinion of all who have been concerned with them, and it is the fact above all others which has primarily influenced that semi-official movement which we now see initiated on serious lines in favour of introducing...
Page 46 - Really a mule talks to his neighbour with his ears. It is a kind of signalling ; and if you learn to read the language of those long uprights, winking and nodding, you will really begin to know something worth knowing about mules. I have seen a line of mules in single file walking quietly towards the " brow," which is the gangway between the dock and the ship.
Page 39 - Colour does not possess that importance which attached to it before the advent of the camouflage officer. To see him as one of a team of gun horses is to enjoy a delightful spectacle. He is active, willing, under instant command, and he is imposing. Ask any officer of Field Artillery and, where the lighter kind of horses with galloping conformation are concerned, any officer of Horse Artillery ; they will, I am sure, give him an excellent

Bibliographic information