Life, Scenery and Customs in Sierra Leone and the Gambia, Volume 1

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R. Bentley, 1850 - Sierra Leone
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Page 164 - Every thing that is new or uncommon, raises a pleasure in the imagination, because it fills the soul with an agreeable surprise, gratifies its curiosity, and gives it an idea of which it was not before possessed. We are indeed so often conversant with one set of objects, and tired out with so many repeated shows of the same things, that Avhatever is new or uncommon, contributes a little to vary human life, and to divert our minds, for a while, with the strangeness of its appearance : it serves us...
Page 140 - Quoth Hudibras, ' It is in vain (I see) to argue 'gainst the grain, Or, like the stars, incline men to What they're averse themselves to do : For when disputes are wearied out, 'Tis interest still resolves the doubt...
Page 164 - We are, indeed, so often conversant with one set of objects, and tired out with so many repeated shows of the same things, that whatever is new or uncommon contributes a little to vary human life, and to divert our minds, for a while, with the strangeness of its appearance: it serves us for a kind of refreshment, 12731 and takes off from that satiety we are apt to complain of in our usual and ordinary entertainments.
Page 102 - Lured by the scent Of steaming crowds, of rank disease, and death, Behold! he rushing cuts the briny flood, Swift as the gale can bear the ship along; And, from the partners of that cruel trade, Which spoils unhappy Guinea of her sons, Demands his share of prey; demands themselves.
Page 271 - Not only do persons live there, but live to a good age, enjoy health, and thus afford living proofs that no rule is without its exception. " And what may not be hoped for, under the Divine blessing, from attention to drainage, cleanly habits, well-ventilated and airy houses, the introduction in common use of glass windows, the removal of all decomposed vegetable matter, and those many other artificial and scientific resources which are now continually pouring themselves into the Colony ? " A short...
Page 55 - Nor rural sights alone, but rural sounds, Exhilirate the spirit, and restore The tone of languid Nature. — Mighty winds, That sweep the skirt of some far-spreading wood Of ancient growth, make music not unlike The dash of ocean on his winding shore, And lull the spirit...
Page 302 - ... course of which he frequently employs expressions on this subject similar to the following : — ' The notions of people, respecting the true position of Sierra Leone, in all its details of local circumstances, resources, daily life, attainments, as well as deficiencies, advantages and disadvantages — political and social — are not only underrated, but very erroneous. Conveniences, comforts, luxuries, are possessed and anxiously sought after. It is, indeed, inseparable from the progress of...
Page 302 - ... only underrated, but very erroneous. Conveniences, comforts, luxuries, are possessed and anxiously sought after. It is, indeed, inseparable from the progress of civilisation that wants should multiply ; and as these increase, the means, of course, for satisfying them will be proportionally acquired. In no respect is this more perceptible than in the attention which is paid to, and the expense which is bestowed in adapting the private residences to European ideas of what is requisite for style...
Page 175 - Ranse palustres," which not the utmost stretch of fancy can allow is a pleasant noise. Then there is in the first enclosure just mentioned, a tall cocoa-nut tree, which marks a Spot of mournful interest, in ruminating on which we would think more sorrowfully of kindred ties never perhaps to be reunited in this world. For the...
Page 33 - His Excellency." Touching me goodnaturedly on the shoulder, and calling me aside whilst a pleasing smile of amiable humility lit up his countenance, — " Mr. Poole," he said, " you will oblige me by not calling me 'His Excellency.

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