The Politics of Sexuality in Latin America

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University of Pittsburgh Pre, 2010 - History - 473 pages
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The city of Buenos Aires has guaranteed all couples, regardless of gender, the right to register civil unions. Mexico City has approved the Cohabitation Law, which grants same-sex couples marital rights identical to those of common-law relationships between men and women. Yet, a gay man was murdered every two days in Latin America in 2005, and Brazil recently led the world in homophobic murders. These facts illustrate the wide disparity in the treatment and rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations across the region.

The Politics of Sexuality in Latin America presents the first English-language reader on LGBT politics in Latin America. Representing a range of contemporary works by scholars, activists, analysts, and politicians, the chapters address LGBT issues in nations from Cuba to Argentina. In their many findings, two main themes emerge: the struggle for LGBT rights has made significant inroads in the first decade of the twenty-first century (though not in every domain or every region); and the advances made were slow in coming compared to other social movements.

The articles uncover the many obstacles that LGBT activists face in establishing new laws and breaking down societal barriers. They identify perhaps the greatest roadblock in Latin American culture as an omnipresent system of “heteronormativity,” wherein heterosexuality, patriarchalism, gender hierarchies, and economic structures are deeply rooted in nearly every level of society. Along these lines, the texts explore specific impediments including family dependence, lack of public spaces, job opportunities, religious dictums, personal security, the complicated relationship between leftist political parties and LGBT movements in the region, and the ever-present “closets,” which keep LGBT issues out of the public eye.

The volume also looks to the future of LGBT activism in Latin America in areas such as globalization, changing demographics, the role of NGOs, and the rise of economic levels and education across societies, which may aid in a greater awareness of LGBT politics and issues. As the editors posit, to be democratic in the truest sense of the word, nations must recognize and address all segments of their populations.

 

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter1
33
Chapter2
44
Chapter3
60
Chapter4
69
Chapter5
86
Chapter6
102
Chapter7
122
Chapter20
274
Chapter21
283
Chapter22
290
Chapter23
303
Chapter24
312
Chapter25
334
Chapter26
349
Chapter27
358

Chapter8
135
Chapter9
144
Chapter10
175
Chapter11
197
Chapter12
212
Chapter13
220
Chapter14
224
Chapter15
233
Chapter16
251
Chapter17
259
Chapter18
265
Chapter19
270
Chapter28
365
Chapter29
372
Chapter30
381
Chapter31
387
Chapter32
401
Chapter33
406
Chapter34
421
Appendix
429
Index
439
Spine
455
Back Cover
456
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Javier Corrales is associate professor of political science at Amherst College. He is the author of Presidents without Parties: The Politics of Economic Reform in Argentina and Venezuela in the 1990s.Mario Pecheny is professor of political science at the University of Buenos Aires and has been a visiting professor at Columbia University.