This Book Needs No Title: A Budget of Living Paradoxes

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Simon and Schuster, Oct 15, 1986 - Games - 192 pages
5 Reviews
Eighty paradoxes, logical lobyrinths, and intriguing enigmas progress from light fables and fancies to challenging Zen exercises and a novella and probe the timeless questions of philosophy and life
 

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Review: This Book Needs No Title: A Budget of Living Paradoxes

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Review: This Book Needs No Title: A Budget of Living Paradoxes

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Contents

Want to Be Envied 3 The Man Who Wanted
11
Cant or Wont? 17 A Rationalist and
25
A Strange Paradox 41 Four American
46
The Seer and the Skeptic 51
56
Bits and Pieces 56 Determinism or Free
66
WELL
77
A Remark on Spontaneity 77 This Is Very Diffi
85
The Sage and the Dog 93 A Zen Fragment
93
Why Does Water Run Down
110
THE FRUIT OF KNOWLEDGE
119
The Modern Period 153 II The Middle
176
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About the author (1986)

Raymond Smullyan is considered one of America's most inventive creators of logic puzzles. His many writings include a previous volume of recreational logic and math problems, What Is the Name of This Book?; two studies of deductive logic in chess, The Chess Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes and The Chess Mysteries of the Arabian Nights; two collections of philosophical essays and aphorisms; The Tao Is Silent and This Book Needs No Title, and most recently, Satan, Cantor, and Infinity. He is a professor of mathematical logic at Indiana University.

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