Two Collections of Derbicisms Containing Words and Phrases in a Great Measure Peculiar to the Natives and Inhabitants of the County of Derby, Volume 32, Issue 2

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English dialect society, 1896 - Derbyshire (England) - 138 pages
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Page xl - Brindle for a few years, an opportunity offered, by another obliging acquiescence of the Duke of Devonshire, to exchange it for the living of Heath (alias Lown) in his Grace's Patronage, which lies within seven miles of Whittington ; a very commodious measure, as it brought Mr. Pegge's parochial preferments within a smaller distance of each other. He was accordingly inducted into the vicarage of Heath, Oct. 22, 1758, which he held till his death.
Page xxvii - LL. D. and FSA was the representative of one of four branches of the family of that name in Derbyshire, derived from a common ancestor, all which existed together till within a few years. The eldest became extinct by the death of Mr. William Pegge, of Yeldersley, near Ashborne, 1768; and another by that of the Rev. Nathaniel Pegge, MA vicar of Packington, in Leicestershire, 1782. The Doctor's immediate predecessors, as may appear from the...
Page xxxiii - We are now coming to a new epoch in the Doctor's life ; but, there is an interval of a few years to be accounted for, before he found an opportunity of effectually removing himself into Derbyshire.
Page xxxii - Leyden, with a fellow collegian (John Stubbing, MB then a medical pupil under Boerhaave), leaving his curacy to the charge of some of the neighbouring clergy. On his return, therefore, he was not a little surprized to obtain actual preferment through Dr. Lynch, without the most distant engagement on the score of the Doctor's interest with the Archbishop, or the smallest suggestion from Mr. Pegge. Being now in possession of a living, and independent property, Mr. Pegge married (April 13, 1732) Miss...
Page xxxviii - Cambridge, for whom the deanry of Winchester was intended by the minister on the part of the Crown. Thus Mr. Pegge's interests and applications were to begin de novo with the patron of Brampton ; for, his nomination by Dr. Cheyney, in the then state of things, was of no validity. He fell however into liberal hands ; for his activity in the proceedings which had hitherto taken place respecting the living in question, had rendered fresh advocates unnecessary, as it had secured the unasked favour of...
Page xlvii - Whittington (where he constantly resided) to another (except to the neighbouring clergy during the excursions before mentioned) till the failure of his eye-sight rendered it indispensably necessary; and even that did not happen till within a few years of his death. As a preacher, his discourses from the pulpit were of the didactic and exhortatory kind, appealing to the understandings rather than to the passions of his auditory, by expounding the Holy Scriptures in a plain, intelligible, and unaffected...
Page xxxvii - Mr. Pegge, not suspecting that the contest could go any farther, attended to qualify at Brampton, on Sunday, Aug. 28, 1748, in the usual manner; but was repelled by violence from entering the church. In this state matters rested regarding the patronage of Brampton, when Dr. Cheyney...
Page xxix - Green], representing, that, as the College had, by the testimonial, thought him qualified for ordination, it could not, in justice, deem him unworthy of becoming a fellow of the society upon such forcible claims as founder's kin, and also as a native of Derbyshire. These were irresistible pleas on the part of Mr.
Page xxxix - Derbyshire began soon to brighten ; and he ere long obtained the more eligible living of Whittington> Add to this that, in the course of the dispute concerning the patronage of Brampton, he became known to the Hon. and Right Rev. Frederick (CornWallis) Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry; who ever afterwards favoured him not only with his personal regard, but with his patronage, which extended even beyond the grave, as will be mentioned hereafter, in the order of time, We must now revert to Mr. Pegge's...
Page xlvii - In his avocations from reading and retirement, few men could relax with more ease and cheerfulness, or better understood the desipere in loco; — could enter occasionally into temperate convivial mirth with a superior grace, or more interest and : enliven every company by general conversation. As he did not mix in business of a public nature, his better qualities appeared most conspicuously in private circles; for he possessed an equanimity which obtained the esteem of his friends, and an affability...

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