The Freedom of Man in Myth

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Wipf and Stock Publishers, Aug 1, 2010 - Religion - 214 pages
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Myth is not a remote subject, restricted to the limited intellect of "pre-logical" man. The question "What is man?" is an ancient one. It is also a recent one, still unanswered in the impasse of our sciences. Wherever and whenever human beings are alive, there are creators of myth among them. Kees Bolle singles out one group as having the most significant "say" in the formation of myths: the mystics, who epitomize the common urge for a simplicity beyond the whirlpool of personal existences. And, surprisingly, the author finds that the study of humor provides a great deal of insight into the study of religious traditions.
 

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User Review  - gmicksmith - LibraryThing

This work, by a former professor of mine, is one of the most intellectually focused books on my interest in the history of religion. Read full review

Contents

A New Interest
3
Themes and Ideas
14
Reformulation of the Question
31
Characteristics of Humor
41
The Churning of the Ocean
73
A Final Examination
83
Reconnaissance
97
1O Subjectivity and Objectivity
112
Histories and Types
118
The Origin the Supreme Visible and Invisible
132
Mystical Knowledge
141
Universality Beyond the Official Tradition
151
Creative Allegorization and New Symbols
159
Appendix
187
Index
193
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