Concurrent Programming: Principles and Practice

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Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company, 1991 - Computers - 637 pages

This book provides an in-depth overview of underlying principles as well as practical techniques that can be used to design concurrent programs. Anyone interested in sequential and concurrent computing will find this book to be an essential reference and innovative work. Andrews shows how to approach key decisions, discusses the tradeoffs between how processes should be used, and explains how those processes should interact.

0805300864B04062001

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Contents

Basic Concepts
1
Sequential Programming
7
Historical Notes and References
47
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Gregory Andrews received a B.S. degree in Mathematics from Stanford University in 1969 and a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of Washington in 1974. From 1974-79 he was an Assistant Professor at Cornell University. Since 1979 he has been at The University of Arizona, where he is currently Professor of Computer Science. From 1986-93 he chaired the department; in 1986 he received a distinguished teaching award.

Greg has been on the editorial board of Information Processing Letters since 1979. He was the general chair of the Twelfth ACM Symposium on Operating Systems Principles in 1989 and has been on the program committees of numerous conferences. From 1988-92 he was on advisory committees for the computing directorate of the National Science Foundation. Since 1991 he has been on the Board of Directors of the Computing Research Association (CRA).

Greg's research interests include all aspects of concurrent programming. A long-term project has been the design and implementation of the SR programming language. Current work focuses on the development of Filaments, a software package that provides efficient fine-grain parallelism on a variety of parallel machines.

0805300864AB04062001

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