Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volume 13: Guide to Ethnohistorical Sources, Part Two

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Robert Wauchope
University of Texas Press, 1973 - Social Science - 439 pages
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This book is part of an encyclopedia set concerning the environment, archaeology, ethnology, social anthropology, ethnohistory, linguistics and physical anthropology of the native peoples of Mexico and Central America. The Guide to Ethnohistorical Sources is comprised of volumes 12-15 of this set. Volume 13 presents a look at pre-Columbian Mesoamerican from a combined historical and anthropological viewpoint, using official ecclesiastical and government records from the time.
 

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Contents

Documentary Collections of
9
References p
30
General Works by Northern Europeans
57
A Summary
138
Works About the Nahuatl Language
203
Discussion p
217
National and International Trends
223
Antonio de Herrcra 15491625
240
Charles Etienne Brasseur de Bourbourg 18141874
298
Hubert Howe Bancroft 18321918
326
Bancroft Principal Works
344
Western Mesoamerican NativeTradition
350
Mayanist Researches p
359
Selected NineteenthCentury Mexican Writers on Ethnohistory
370
Manuel Orozco y Berra 18101881 p
377
Alfredo Chavero 18411906 p
386

Juan de Torquemada 15641624
256
Francisco Javier Clavigero 17311787
271
Publishing History p
281
Clavigeros Sources p
289
Chavero Selected Writings
408
References p
423
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About the author (1973)

Born in Detroit, Howard Francis Cline received undergraduate and graduate degrees from Harvard University, where he specialized in Mexican history mainly under the direction of historian Clarence Haring. With a special interest in social and ethnic history, having spent a year working in the Mexican Department of Indian Affairs, Cline wrote his doctoral dissertation on social conflict in mid-nineteenth-century Yucatan. He then looked at the larger sweep of Mexican history and the critical decades of the mid-twentieth century. His books on these latter topics were standard reading for a generation of students of Mexican history after World War II and contributed to the growing appreciation in the United States of the importance of Mexico and its history. Like Frank Tannenbaum, Cline did much to make the Mexican revolution understandable to a U.S. audience. From 1952 until his death, Cline served as director of the Hispanic Foundation of the Library of Congress. He also was a prime mover in the 1967 Conference on Latin American History. In this role he inaugurated the publication of various invaluable reference works, including his own two-volume edited survey of Mexican historical studies.

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