A handbook of chemical engineering: illustrated with working examples and numerous drawings from actual installations, Volume 2

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Davis Bros., 1904 - Chemical engineering
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Page 368 - Ampere, which is one-tenth of the unit of current of the CGS system of electromagnetic units and which is represented sufficiently well for practical use by the unvarying current which, when passed through a solution of nitrate of silver in water, in accordance with a certain specification, deposits silver at the rate of 0.001118 of a gramme per second.
Page 367 - As a unit of resistance, the international ohm, which is based upon the ohm equal to 10" units of resistance of the CGS system of electromagnetic units, and is represented by the resistance offered to an unvarying electric current by a column of mercury at the temperature of melting ice, 14.4521 grams in mass, of a constant cross-sectional area and of the length of 106.3 centimetres.
Page 368 - Ampere, which has the value ^ in terms of the centimetre, the gramme and the second of time, and which is represented by the unvarying electric current which, when passed through a solution of nitrate of silver in water in accordance with the specification appended hereto and marked A, deposits silver at the rate of O'OOlllS of a gramme per second.
Page 29 - ... instance — is opened, the blast and stack valves being simultaneously closed by means of the gearing on the working stage. Steam is then admitted to the bottom of the generator, and, passing up through the bed of incandescent coke, is decomposed, forming water gas. A set of water gauges and a test flame indicate the condition of the apparatus and the quality of the gas. When the temperature of the fuel has sunk below the suitable point, so that carbon dioxide begins to form in a larger proportion,...
Page 368 - ... of the electrical pressure at a temperature of 15 C. between the poles of the voltaic cell known as Clark's cell set up in accordance with the specification appended hereto, and marked B.
Page 320 - When a gas is saturated with vapour, the actual tension of the mixture is the sum of the tensions due to the gas and vapour separately; that is to say, it is equal to the pressure which the gas would exert if it alone occupied the whole space, plus the maximum tension...
Page 28 - The surrounding sheetiron shell is lined with firebrick. On a level with the clinkering doors is a grate supporting the fuel ; below are ash doors for removal of the ashes. The air enters through the blast-valve, and the blow-gas leaves the generator through the central stack-valve, through which the fuel is also charged by means of a small coke wagon. There is one water gas outlet at the top of the generator and one below the grate, both connected with a three-way valve, through which the gas passes...
Page 29 - ... is opened, and the fuel raised to a high degree of incandescence in a few minutes. Then one of the gas outlets — the upper one, for instance — is opened, the blast and stack valves being simultaneously closed by means of the gearing on the working stage. Steam is then admitted to the...
Page 256 - ... in proportion as the pressure of the gas is greater. We may lay down, then, the two following laws for the mixture of a vapour with a gas:— 1. The weight of vapour which will enter a given space is the same whether this space be empty or filled with gas, provided plenty of time be allowed. 2. When a gas is saturated with vapour, the actual tension of the mixture is the sum of the tensions due to the gas and vapour separately...
Page 28 - ... generator through the central stack-valve, through which the fuel is also charged by means of a small coke wagon. There is one water gas outlet at the top of the generator and one below the grate, both connected with a three-way valve, through which the gas passes on its way to the scrubber. The gas-pipe is sealed with water in the bottom of the scrubber, where the gas is cooled and all dust washed out by the water running through the coke, with which the scrubber is filled. From the scrubber...

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