Creative Imitation and Latin Literature

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Cambridge University Press, May 7, 2007 - History - 255 pages
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The poets and prose-writers of Greece and Rome were acutely conscious of their literary heritage. They expressed this consciousness in the regularity with which, in their writings, they imitated and alluded to the great authors who had preceded them. Such imitation was generally not regarded as plagiarism but as essential to the creation of a new literary work: imitating one's predecessors was in no way incompatible with originality or progress. These views were not peculiar to the writers of Greece and Rome but were adopted by many others who have written in the 'classical tradition' right up to modern times. Creative Imitation and Latin Literature is an exploration of this concept of imitation. The contributors analyse selected passages from various authors - Greek, Latin and English - in order to demonstrate how Latin authors created new works of art by imitating earlier passages of literature.
 

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Contents

1 DE IMITATIONE
1
2 PLAVTVS VORTIT BARBARE
17
3 FROM POLYPHEMUS TO CORYDON
35
4 TWO PLAGUES
71
5 HORATIAN IMITATIO AND ODES 25
89
6 IVDICIVM TRANSFERENDI
103
7 SELFIMITATION WITHIN A GENERIC FRAMEWORK
121
8 SELFIMITATION AND THE SUBSTANCE OF HISTORY
143
9 LENTE CVRRITE NOCTIS EQVI
157
10 PYRAMUS AND THISBE IN SHAKESPEARE AND OVID
173
II EPILOGUE
195
Notes
201
Abbreviations and bibliography
241
Select indexes
253
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

A. J. Woodman is Basil L. Gildersleeve Professor of Classics, University of Virginia.

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