Memoirs of the life and reign of King George the Third, Volume 2

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Tinsley brothers, 1867 - Great Britain
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Page 183 - You may swell every expense, and every effort, still more extravagantly; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince, that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Page 71 - Sir they may talk of the King as they will; but he is the finest gentleman I have ever seen." And he afterwards observed to Mr. Langton, "Sir, his manners are those of as fine a gentleman as we may suppose Lewis the Fourteenth or Charles the Second.
Page 348 - Why, well; Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience. The king has...
Page 184 - it was perfectly justifiable to use all the means that God and nature put into our hands!" I AM ASTONISHED ! — shocked ! to hear such principles confessed — to hear them avowed in this House, or in this country ; principles equally unconstitutional, inhuman, and unchristian ! My lords, I did not intend to have encroached again upon your attention; but I cannot repress my indignation.
Page 185 - These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation.
Page 153 - I know your great motive in coming hither was the hope of being instrumental in a reconciliation ; and I believe, when you find that impossible on any terms given you to propose, you will relinquish so odious a command, and return to a more honorable private station.
Page 185 - My lords, we are called upon as members of this House, as men, as Christian men, to protest against such notions standing near the Throne, polluting the ear of majesty. "That God and nature put into our hands!
Page 183 - German despot ; your attempts will be for ever vain and impotent — doubly so, indeed, from this mercenary aid on which you rely; for it irritates, to an incurable resentment, the minds of your adversaries, to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder, devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling cruelty. If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms : Never, never, never...
Page 517 - I not only receive with pleasure the assurance of the friendly dispositions of the United States, but that I am very glad the choice has fallen upon you to be their minister. I wish you, sir, to believe, and that it may be understood in America, that I have done nothing in the late contest but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the duty which I owed to my people. I will be very frank with you.
Page 109 - You are a Member of Parliament, and one of that Majority which has doomed my Country to Destruction. — You have begun to burn our Towns, and murder our People. — Look upon your Hands ! — They are stained with the Blood of your Relations ! You and I were long friends : — You are now my Enemy, — and ' I am, yours,

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