Riding and driving, by 'Stonehenge'.

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Page 59 - ... by fine handling rather than by force, and by occasional pressure, which he will yield to and play with if allowed, rather than by a dead pull. In this way, by taking advantage of every inch yielded, and yet not going too far, the head is gradually brought in, and the...
Page 94 - ... exactly equally matched, the coupling-reins must both be of equal length ; but this is seldom the case ; and when they do not do an equal amount of work, the coupling-rein of the free one must be taken up, and that of the idle horse let out. In watching the working of the two horses the pole-pieces should always be the guide ; and if both are slack, with the end of the pole steady, and neither horse shouldering it, the driver may rest contented that his horses are...
Page 85 - HARNESS. 79 refuse of the hunting-stock or of the racing-stud ; those which are too clumsy and slow for those purposes being put to harness. Some are good trotters and yet bad gallopers, and they are, consequently, as well fitted for harness work as they are unsuited for hunting. A great number of gigsters are also under-sized carriage horses, which last are the produce of Cleveland or Clydesdale mares by well-bred or even thorough-bred horses.
Page 91 - I have had several bad jibbers which never showed that tendency for some time after breaking. When the horse is first put in single harness, it should be in a break expressly made with strong and stout shafts, and high enough to prevent his kicking over ; though some horses are able to kick over anything, and no kicking-strap will hold them down. A safety-rein should be added, buckled on to the lower bar of the bit, and passed through a ring on the tug and by the side of the dashboard up to the hand,...
Page 96 - ... when thoroughly put together, yet to make them pull equally ; and there are very few pairs which do not occasionally want a little reminding of their duties. A constant change from one side to the other is a prevention of those tricks and bad habits which horses get into if they are kept to one side only. The coachman should, therefore, change them every now and then, and back again, so as to make what was a puller from the pole, rather bear towards it than otherwise when put on the other side.
Page 86 - They are now reversed* altogether, and the pad put in its place ; before buckling the belly-band of which, the crupper is slipped over the tail by doubling up all the hair, and grasping it carefully in the left hand while the right adapts the crupper. A careful examination should always be made that no hairs are left under it, for if they are they irritate the skin, and often cause a fit of kicking. After the crupper is set right the pad is drawn forwards, and its belly-band buckled up pretty tightly;...
Page 95 - borne up," and the pair match much better than when they are suffered to stand at ease. In driving a pair, it should always be remembered that there are two methods of driving round a curve, one by pulling the inside rein, and the other by hitting the outside horse ; and these two should generally be combined, graduating the use of the whip by the thinness of the skin of the horse. In all cases the whip is required in double harness, if not to drive horses when thoroughly put together, yet to make...
Page 84 - ... hands. Ponies are met with all over England, Ireland, and Scotland, and are of various breeds, some of which are of wonderful powers of endurance, with good symmetry and action, and with never-failing legs and feet. In general soundness they far excel the larger varieties of the horse, for which there is no accounting, as they are much more neglected and frequently very ill-used. A broken-winded pony, or a roarer, is a very uncommon sight, and even a lame one is by no means an every-day occurrence.
Page 50 - Thus, there are many horses which never shy at meeting tilted wagons, or other similarly alarming objects, but which almost drop with fear on a small bird flying out of a hedge, or any other startling sound. These last are also worse, because they give no notice to the rider, whereas the ordinary shyer almost always shows by his ears that he is prepared to turn round. THE BEST PLAN OF TREATMENT which can be adopted, is to take as little notice as possible of the shying, and to be especially careful...
Page 87 - ... slipped under or over the ends of the shafts, according to the formation of the tugs, some being hooks, and others merely leather loops. Care must be taken that they do not slip beyond the pins on the shafts. The traces are now attached to the drawing-bar, the breechen or kicking-strap buckled, and the false belly-band buckled up pretty tightly, so as to keep the shafts steady. In four-wheeled carriages it should be left tolerably loose when a breechen is used, to allow of this having free play....

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