Routine Violence: Nations, Fragments, Histories

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Stanford University Press, 2006 - Social Science - 228 pages
Much has been written about the "extraordinary" violence of recent history, its brutality, and the impossibility of describing it. Routine Violence focuses on the violence of much more routine political practices--the drawing up of political categories and the writing of national histories.

The book takes its material from the history of twentieth-century India: the land of Gandhi and of effective nonviolent resistance to British colonial rule. It asks questions about how particular histories are claimed as the "real" histories of a nation; how the "sacred" nation, and its ("mainstream") culture and politics, come to be constructed; and how a certain inducement to violence, and a collective amnesia regarding that violence, follow from all of this.

This is the first book to engage in a sustained investigation of the routine political violence of our times.

No sales in India, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan.

 

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Contents

Introduction Negotiating the Boundaries of Political Violence
1
In Defense of the Fragment
16
Reply to a RightWing Journalist
45
The Nation and Its Past
50
Monumental History
68
Ayodhya and the State
93
The Question of Belonging
103
Marked and Unmarked Citizens
129
Cognizing Community
154
The Secular State?
172
Notes
193
Further Reading
217
Index
221
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Gyanendra Pandey is Asa Griggs Candler Professor of History at Emory University; a founder member of "Subaltern Studies"; and author of The Construction of Communalism in Colonial North India (1990) and Remembering Partition: Violence, Nationalism and History in India (2001) among other books.

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