The Heart of the Buddha: Entering the Tibetan Buddhist Path

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Shambhala Publications, Aug 6, 1991 - Religion - 272 pages
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In The Heart of the Buddha, the Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa presents the basic teachings of Buddhism as they relate to everyday life. The book is divided into three parts. In "Personal Journey," the author discusses the open, inquisitive, and good-humored qualities of the "heart of the Buddha," an "enlightened gene" that everyone possesses. In "Stages on the Path," he presents the three vehicles—Hinayana, Mahayana, and Vajrayana—that carry the Buddhist practitioner toward enlightenment. In "Working with Others," he describes the direct application of Buddhist teachings to topics as varied as relationships, drinking, children, and money. The Heart of the Buddha reflects Trungpa’s great appreciation for Western culture and deep understanding of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, which enabled him to teach Westerners in an effective, contemporary way.
 

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Contents

What Is the Heart of the Buddha?
3
Intellect and Intuition
12
The Four Foundations of Mindfulness
18
Devotion
47
stages on the path
67
Taking Refuge
69
Bodhisattva Vow
87
The Practice of Vajrayogini
106
Acknowledging Death
143
Alcohol as Medicine or Poison
150
A Talk for Children
155
Dharma Poetics
161
Green Energy
167
Manifesting Enlightenment
169
The Bon Way of Life
177
The Vajrayogini Shrine
187

working with others
137
Relationship
139
List of Sources
193
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About the author (1991)

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987)—meditation master, teacher, and artist—founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, the first Buddhist-inspired university in North America; the Shambhala Training program; and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books including Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and The Myth of Freedom.

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