New Improvements of Planting and Gardening: Both Philosophical and Practical : Explaining the Motion of the Sap and Generation of Plants ...

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W. Mears, 1718 - Gardening - 70 pages
 

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Page 47 - ... may be made in an hour, than can be found in all the books now extant.
Page 159 - Can there be any thing more agreeable in the Winter, than to have a View from a Parlour or Study, through Ranges of Orange-Trees, and curious Plants of foreign Countries...
Page 6 - ... respects alike, the Farina of the one will impregnate the other, and the Seed so enlivened will produce a Plant differing from either, as may now be seen in the garden of Mr. Thomas Fairchild, of Hoxton, a plant neither Sweet William nor Carnation, but resembling both equally, which was raised from the seed of a Carnation that had been impregnated by the Farina of the Sweet William.
Page 5 - Moreover, a curious Person may by this knowledge produce such rare kinds of Plants as have not yet been heard of, by making choice of two Plants for his Purpose, as are near alike in their Parts...
Page 133 - They were also exposed to destruction from another cause, the force of the steam ; for they had no safety-valves to regulate it, and hence the necessity of the following instructions : " When you have rais'd water enough, and you design to leave off working the engine, take away all the fire from under the boiler, and open the cock [connected to the tunnel] to let out the steam, which would otherwise, was it to remain confin'd, perhaps burst the engine," Savery, from his profession, was aware of...
Page 37 - Infeft then is nourifhed by the Juices of the Tree, and grows together with the Leaves, till all its Body is perfected ; and at the Fall of the Leaf, drops from the Tree with the Leaves growing to its Body like Wings, and then walks about...
Page 4 - Fruits should be fecundated with the Dust of the Summer kinds, they will decay before their usual Time ; and it is from this accidental coupling of the Farina of one with the other, that in an Orchard where there is Variety of Apples, even the Fruit...
Page 159 - Countries, bloflbming, and bearing Fruit, when our Gardens without Doors are, as it were, in a State of Death, and to walk among thofe Curiofities of Nature as in the moft temperate Climate, PART IV.
Page 24 - Creatures moving in that fmall Quantity of Water : Nay, they tell us, that becaufe they would be within Compafs , they only related half the Number that they believ'd they had feen. Now, from the...

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