The Imagined Underworld: Sex, Crime, and Vice in Porfirian Mexico City

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U of Nebraska Press, Dec 1, 2007 - Social Science - 233 pages
Recounts six infamous crimes committed in nineteenth-century Mexico City and the underworld they were used to create. Examining judicial records, newspapers, government documents, and travel accounts, the author uncovers the truth behind some of nineteenth-century Mexico's most notorious criminals, including the serial killer "El Chalequero."
 

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Contents

Charting the Imagined City
12
The Terror of Peralvillo El Chalequero
38
Love Betrayal and Death in the Underworld
71
Organized Crime and the Porfirian State
97
Disease Decay and the Strange Case of Federico Abrego and María Barrera
131
Politics Corruption and the Arnulfo Arroyo Affair
155
Conclusion
179
Notes
183
Bibliography
201
Index
213
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Page 3 - But they did come to visualize in a general way the existence of thousands and thousands like themselves through printlanguage. For an illiterate bourgeoisie is scarcely imaginable. Thus in world-historical terms bourgeoisies were the first classes to achieve solidarities on an essentially imagined basis.

About the author (2007)

James Alex Garza is an assistant professor of history and ethnic studies at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

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