Exposition of the Principles of Abbott's Hydraulic Engine: With Tables & Engravings, Together with an Illustration of the Power of Wheels Heretofore Used

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S. Rowland Hart, printer, 1835 - Hydraulic engineering - 132 pages
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Page 112 - A sky-rocket ascends, because, after it is lighted, the lower part is always producing a large quantity of aeriform fluid, which, in expanding, presses not only on the air below, but also on the rocket above, and thus lifts it. The ascent is aided also by the recoil of the rocket from the part of its substance, which is constantly bursting downwards. He was a foolish man who thought he had found the means of commanding always a fair wind for his pleasure-boat, by erecting an immense bellows in the...
Page 110 - A man in a boat pulling a rope attached to a large ship, seems only to move the boat: but he really moves the ship a little, for, supposing the resistance of the ship to be just a thousand times greater than that of the boat, a thousand men in a thousand boats, pulling simultaneously in the same manner, would make the ship meet them half way.
Page 120 - Thin plates of brass are to be melted between the pieces that are to be joined. If the work be very fine, as when two leaves of a broken saw are to be brazed together, cover it with pulverized borax, melted with water, that it may incorporate with the. brass powder, which is added to it : the piece must be then exposed to the fire, without touching the coals, and heated till the brass is seen to run.
Page 87 - ... the same properties and powers, and produce real mechanical advantage, because they increase the power; but the third kind produces a decrease of power, and is only used to increase velocity, as in clocks, watches and mills, where the first mover is slow, and the velocity is increased by the gearing of the wheels. The levers which nature employs in the machinery of the human frame are of the third kind; for when we lift a weight by the hand, the muscle that exerts the force to raise the weight,...
Page 116 - And where the connection between different pieces of copper was completed by wires, or thin filaments of the fortieth or fiftieth of an inch in diameter, the effect was the same...
Page 71 - The following table gives the contents of a pipe one inch in diameter, in weight and measure ; which serves as a standard for pipes of other diameters, their contents being found by the following rule. Multiply the numbers in the following table against any height, by the square of the diameter of the pipe, and the product will be the number of cubic inches, avoirdupois ounces, and wine gallons of water, that the given pipe will contain. EXAMPLE. How many wine gallons of water is contained in a pipe...
Page 96 - ... provided the elbow of one of the handles be at right angles to that of the other. And with a fly, or heavy wheel, applied to it, a man may do...
Page 114 - ... as follows : The approaching ball, at a certain point of time, has just given half of its motion to the other equal ball ; and if both were of soft clay, they would then proceed together with half the original velocity ; but, as they are elastic, the touching parts at the moment supposed, are compressed like a spring between the balls ; and by...
Page 84 - These laws, viz. that the planets move in ellipses round the sun ; that each describes about the sun's centre equal areas in equal times ; and that in the orbits of different planets the squares of the periodical times are proportional to the cubes of the distances...
Page 93 - ... of continuous bodies that are to be separated, or from the weights of bodies to be raised, the excess of the force remaining, after all those resistances are overcome, will produce an acceleration of motion proportional thereto, as well in the parts of the machine as in the resisting body.

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