Rebuilding the Royal Navy: Warship Design Since 1945

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Naval Institute Press, 2003 - History - 208 pages
This fourth and final volume in this series on Royal Navy warship development presents an in-depth and lucid account of British warship construction in the challenging half-century since World War II. After considering the wartime legacy and lingering austerity, the authors cover some of the ambitious ideas for the bigger ships like the reconstruction of the carrier Victorious, and the conversion of fleet destroyers into anti-submarine frigates. But most of the book is devoted to new construction with chapters on all the major categories and new information on designs that remained on the drawing board. It concludes with a survey of the most significant technological innovations and an analysis of the impact of the Falklands War. D. K. Brown's personal knowledge and experience and George Moore's in-depth research on declassified material add up to a crowning finale to an internationally acclaimed series.

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About the author (2003)

George Moore was born in County Mayo, Ireland on February 24, 1852. He originally wanted to be a painter, and studied art in Paris during the 1870s. While in Paris, his first poetry collection, The Flowers of Passion, was self-published in 1877. He eventually decided to become a professional writer. In 1881, he published his second poetry collection, Pagan Poems. He wrote numerous poetry collections, short story collections, and novels including A Modern Lover (1883); A Mummer's Wife (1885); Esther Waters (1894); Sister Teresa (1901); The Brook Kerith (1916); and Aphroditis in Aulis (1930). He also found success as an art critic with books such as Impressions and Opinions (1891) and Modern Painting (1893). As an autobiographer, he wrote His Confessions of a Young Man (1888), Memoirs of My Dead Life (1906), and the trilogy Hail and Farewell! (1911-14). He also wrote the plays The Strike at Arlingford (1893) and Diarmuid and Grania (1901). He died of uraemia on January 21, 1933.

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