Slave Nation: How Slavery United the Colonies and Sparked the American Revolution

Front Cover
Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006 - History - 356 pages
6 Reviews
"A radical, well-informed, and highly original reinterpretation of the place of slavery in the American War of Independence."-David Brion Davis, Yale University
In 1772, the High Court in London brought about the conditions that would end slavery in England by freeing a black slave from Virginia named Somerset. This decision began a key facet of independence.
Slave Nation is a fascinating account of the role slavery played in the drawing of the United States Constitution and in shaping the United States. At the Constitutional Convention, the South feared that the Northern states would leave the Convention over the issue of slavery. In a compromise, the Southern states agreed to slavery's prohibition north of the Ohio River, resulting in the Northwest Ordinance. This early national division would continue to escalate, eventually only reaching resolution through the Civil War.
 

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Review: Slave Nation: How Slavery United the Colonies and Sparked the American Revolution

User Review  - Monte Lamb - Goodreads

The premise of the book is that an agreement between the northern colonies and the southern colonies in 1774 which said that slavery would be protected in the southern colonies in return for their ... Read full review

Review: Slave Nation: How Slavery United the Colonies and Sparked the American Revolution

User Review  - Scott Ford - Goodreads

In 1772, the British High Court began the process of closing down the institution of slavery in England. This book proposes that the events that took place in England at this time convinced the ... Read full review

All 6 reviews »

Contents

Somersets Journey Sparks the American Revolution
1
The Tinderbox
15
Virginia Responds to the Somerset Decision
33
The Virginia Resolution Unites the Colonies and Leads to the First Continental Congress in 1774
57
John Adams Supports the South on Slavery
73
The Colonies Claim Independence from Parliament
99
The Immortal Ambiguity All Men Are Created Equal
121
The Articles of Confederation Reject Somerset and Protect Slavery
145
Deadlock over Slavery in the Constitutional Convention
171
A SlaveFree Northwest Territory
203
Cementing the Bargain Ratification by Virginia and the First Congress
225
How Then Should We View the Founding Fathers?
245
In Memoriam
263
Bibliography of Works Cited
267
Notes
275
Index
329

The Lure of the West Slavery Protected in the Territories
157

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About the author (2006)

Alfred W. Blumrosen is the Thomas A. Cowan Professor of Law at Rutgers University in New Jersey, specializing in labor and employment law, and has a long history in enforcement of civil rights.

The late Ruth Gerber Blumrosen was an adjunct professor of law at Rutgers Law School and also worked in civil rights compliance.

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