Popular Lectures on Science and Art: Delivered in the Principal Cities and Towns of the United States, Volume 2

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Henry W. Law, 1856 - Science
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Page 77 - And God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the cattle that were with him in the ark: and God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters assuaged. The fountains also of the deep, and the windows of heaven were stopped, and the rain from heaven was restrained. And the waters returned from off the earth continually ; and, after the end of the hundred and fifty days, the waters were abated.
Page 383 - It would be a vain task to attempt to count the stars in one of these globular clusters. They are not to be reckoned by hundreds ; and on a rough calculation, grounded on the apparent intervals between them at the borders...
Page 394 - When I pursued these researches, I was in the situation of a natural philosopher who follows the various species of animals and insects from the height of their perfection down to the lowest ebb of life; when, arriving at the vegetable kingdom, he can scarcely point out to us the precise boundary where the animal ceases and the plant begins; and may even go so far as to suspect them not to be essentially different. But recollecting himself, he compares, for instance, one of the human species to a...
Page 387 - ... the firmament of large stars, into which the central cluster would be seen projected, and, owing to its greater distance, appearing like it to consist of stars much smaller than those in other parts of the heavens. " Can it be,
Page 436 - I mentioned to you a method of still doubling the effect of the steam, and that tolerably easy, by using the power of steam rushing into a vacuum, at present lost. This would do little more than double the effect, but it would too much enlarge the vessels to use it all : it is peculiarly applicable to wheel engines, and...
Page 28 - Thus if of two substances, one contains in a given space twice as much matter as the other, it is said to be
Page 394 - I was in the situation of a natural philosopher who follows the various species of animals and insects from the height of their perfection down to the lowest ebb of life; when, arriving at the vegetable kingdom, he can scarcely point out to us the precise boundary where the animal ceases and the plant begins; and may even go so far as to suspect them not to be essentially different. But recollecting himself, he compares, for instance, one of the human species to a tree, and all doubt upon the subject...
Page 204 - For this reason, two persons walking in opposite directions receive from their encounter a more violent shock than might be expected. If they be of nearly equal weight, and one be walking at the rate of three and the other four miles an hour, each sustains the same shock as if he had been at rest, and struck by the other running at the rate of seven miles an hour. This principle accounts for the destructive effects arising from ships running foul of each other at sea. If two ships of 500 tons burden...
Page 391 - ... the nature and destination of this nebulous matter ? Is it absorbed by the stars in whose neighbourhood it is found, to furnish, by its condensation, their supply of light and heat ? or is it progressively concentrating itself by the effect of its own gravity into masses, and so laying the foundation of new sidereal systems or of insulated stars ? It is easier to propound such questions than to offer any probable reply to them. Meanwhile, appeal to fact, by the method of constant and diligent...
Page 291 - This contrivance consists in the use of two screws, the threads of which may have any strength and magnitude, but which have a very small difference of breadth. While the working point is urged forward by that which has the greater thread, it is drawn back by that which has the less; so that during each revolution of the screw, instead of being advanced through a space equal to the magnitude of either of the threads, it moves through a space equal to their difference. The mechanical power of such...

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