Correspondence on Moplah Outrages in Malabar: Vol. [1]. 1849-53

Front Cover
United Scottish Press, 1863 - India
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 442 - Moplah population seeking to throw the blame of these outbreaks upon the landlords by thus charging them with being the cause thereof. I have given the subject every attention, and am convinced that though instances may and do arise of individual hardship to a tenant, the general character of the dealings of the Hindu landlords towards their tenantry, whether Moplah or Hindu, is mild, equitable and forbearing.
Page 13 - SIR : I have the honor to report, for the information of the major general commanding, that the situation here is not improving since my last report.
Page 222 - as imbued ' with a portion of divinity. They swear by his foot as their most solemn oath. Earth on which he has spat or walked is treasured up. Marvellous stories are told of his supernatural knowledge. His blessing is supremely prized.
Page 496 - He says he has given this subject every consideration, and is convinced that though instances may and do arise of individual hardship to a tenant, the general character of the dealings of the Hindu landlords towards their tenantry, whether Moplah or Hindu, is mild, equitable and forbearing.
Page 18 - ... whole breadth of the road, when the enemy came on with most desperate courage, throwing themselves on our bayonets ; after firing off their matchlocks, they took to their war knives, swords and spears, and when struck down to the ground, renewed the fight even on their knees by hurling their weapons at the faces of our men, and which continued until literally, they were cut to pieces ; others, planted on the trees, kept up a most destructive fire with their matchlocks loaded with iron slugs.
Page 18 - ... desperate courage ; but I am happy to say that through the steadiness, correct and low firing of the men, our loss has not been so considerable as might have been expected from the desperate onset of these mad fanatics ; and in the space of half an hour the enemy was completely annihilated, leaving 64 dead, their bodies lying close to each other, exhibiting most dreadful wounds, some having received four or five musket balls, besides bayonet stabs, before these fanatics could be stayed carrying...
Page 51 - Assan, state that, my reason for joining these people, arises from the dictates of religion ; for, when a number of Massalmen are in trouble and danger, it is for us, Seyeds, to join and die with them.
Page 58 - SIR : I have the honor to lay before you a report of the proceedings of the mortar flotilla under my command since the day the vessels entered the Mississippi river. On the 18th of March all the mortar fleet crossed " Pass a l'Outre " bar, towed by the Harriet Lane, Owasco, Westfield, and Clifton, the two latter having arrived that morning.
Page 253 - If any want or a mistake in management on my part has led in the slightest degree to these fearful evils (far more fearful in my time than they have ever been before), I am most desirous that a remedy maybe applied, whatever be the effect as regards my personal interests.
Page 33 - ... had his thigh broken in the engagement in which Lieutenant Wyse was killed. He had remained in all the agony attendant on an unhealed and unattended wound of this nature for seven days ; he had been further tortured by being carried in a rough litter from the Manjeri to the Angadipuram pagoda. Yet there he was at the time of the fight, hopping on his sound leg to the encounter, and only anxious to get a fair blow at the infidels ere he died.

Bibliographic information