Race, Language, and Culture

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University of Chicago Press, 1982 - Social Science - 647 pages
This volume is a collection of the most important essays written by Franz Boas on the science of anthropology.

"Franz Boas is the father of American anthropology and one of the founders of the field of modern anthropology. The book, Race, Language, and Culture, is a collection of some of his most important essays."—David Schneider, University of Chicago

"An exceptional book. Exceptional because it brings into one volume sixty-two papers written by the most influential figure in American anthropology. . . . Exceptional in that it exhibits the wide range of interests and scientific exactness which made it possible for one man to exert such a profound influence on the growing science of anthropology. . . . This is a volume every student of anthropology will wish to possess; it will also have a wide distribution among other students of the social sciences, and all interested in the problems of race."—Fay-Cooper Cole, American Anthropologist
 

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Contents

RACE AND PROGRESS 1931 317
3
MODERN POPULATIONS OF AMERICA 1915 1827
18
REPORT ON AN ANTHROPOMETRIC INVESTIGATION
28
IMMIGRANTS 19101913 6075
60
NEW EVIDENCE IN REGARD TO THE INSTABILITY
76
INFLUENCE OF HEREDITY AND ENVIRONMENT
82
CONDITIONS CONTROLLING THE TEMPO OF DEVEL
89
GROWTH 18921939 revised and condensed 103130
103
EVOLUTION OR DIFFUSION 1924 290294
290
THE ETHNOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF ESOTERIC
306
THE ORIGIN OF TOTEMISM 1910 316323
316
THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN RACE 1911 324330
324
ETHNOLOGICAL PROBLEMS IN CANADA 1910 331343
331
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NORTHWEST AMERICA
344
THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF THE KWAKIUTL
356
THE GROWTH OF THE SECRET SOCIETIES OF
379

STATISTICAL STUDY OF ANTHROPOMETRY 1902 131137
133
THE HALFBLOOD INDIAN 1894 138148
139
REVIEW OF DR PAUL EHRENREICH ANTHROPOLO
149
REVIEW OF WILLIAM Z RIPLEY THE RACES
155
SOME RECENT CRITICISM OF PHYSICAL ANTHRO
165
THE RELATIONS BETWEEN PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL
172
THE MEASUREMENT OF DIFFERENCES BETWEEN
181
RACE AND CHARACTER 1932 191195
191
INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL
199
THE CLASSIFICATION OF AMERICAN LANGUAGES
211
CLASSIFICATION OF AMERICAN INDIAN LANGUAGES
219
SOME TRAITS OF THE DAKOTA LANGUAGE 1937 226231
227
CULTURE
234
THE AIMS OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH 1932 243259
243
SOME PROBLEMS OF METHODOLOGY IN THE SOCIAL
260
THE LIMITATIONS OF THE COMPARATIVE METHOD
270
THE METHODS OF ETHNOLOGY 1920 281289
281
THE DEVELOPMENT OF FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
399
INTRODUCTION TO JAMES TEIT THE TRADITIONS
407
THE GROWTH OF INDIAN MYTHOLOGIES 1895 425436
425
DISSEMINATION OF TALES AMONG THE NATIVES
437
REVIEW OF G W LOCHER THE SERPENT IN KWA
446
STYLISTIC ASPECTS OF PRIMITIVE LITERATURE
493
THE FOLKLORE OF THE ESKIMO 1904 503516
503
ROMANCE FOLKLORE AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS
519
SOME PROBLEMS IN NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOL
525
REPRESENTATIVE ART OF PRIMITIVE PEOPLE 1916 535540
535
REVIEW OF MACCURDY STUDY OF CHIRIQUIAN
541
THE RELATIONSHIPS OF THE ESKIMO OF EAST
593
THE CONCEPT OF SOUL AMONG THE VANDAU 1920 608611
608
ADVANCES IN METHODS OF TEACHING 1898 621625
623
THE STUDY OF GEOGRAPHY 1887 639647
641
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About the author (1982)

Franz Boas, a German-born American anthropologist, became the most influential anthropologist of his time. He left Germany because of its antiliberal and anti-Semitic climate. As a Columbia University professor for 37 years (1899-1936), he created both the field of anthropology and the modern concept of culture. Boas played a key role in organizing the American Anthropological Association (AAA) as an umbrella organization for the emerging field. At both Columbia and the AAA, Boas encouraged the "four field" concept of anthropology; he personally contributed to physical anthropology, linguistics, archaeology, as well as cultural anthropology. His work in these fields was pioneering. Both directly and through the influence of such students as Ruth Benedict, Melville J. Herskovits, Alfred L. Kroeber, and Margaret Mead, he set the agenda for all subsequent American cultural anthropology. In His lifetime Boas had many leadership roles including: Assistant curator at the American Museum of Natural History; editor of The Journal of American Folklore; president of the New York Academy of Sciences, and founder of the International Journal of American Linguistics. Boas is the author of hundreds of scientific monographs and articles. He died in 1942.

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