Race, Language, and Culture

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University of Chicago Press, 1940 - Social Science - 647 pages
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This volume is a collection of the most important essays written by Franz Boas on the science of anthropology.

"Franz Boas is the father of American anthropology and one of the founders of the field of modern anthropology. The book, Race, Language, and Culture, is a collection of some of his most important essays."—David Schneider, University of Chicago

"An exceptional book. Exceptional because it brings into one volume sixty-two papers written by the most influential figure in American anthropology. . . . Exceptional in that it exhibits the wide range of interests and scientific exactness which made it possible for one man to exert such a profound influence on the growing science of anthropology. . . . This is a volume every student of anthropology will wish to possess; it will also have a wide distribution among other students of the social sciences, and all interested in the problems of race."—Fay-Cooper Cole, American Anthropologist
 

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Contents

II
3
III
18
IV
28
V
60
VI
76
VII
82
VIII
86
IX
89
XXXVI
312
XXXVII
316
XXXVIII
324
XXXIX
331
XL
344
XLI
356
XLII
370
XLIII
379

X
94
XI
103
XII
131
XIII
138
XIV
149
XV
155
XVI
160
XVII
165
XVIII
172
XIX
176
XX
181
XXI
191
XXII
197
XXIII
199
XXIV
211
XXV
219
XXVI
226
XXVII
232
XXVIII
241
XXIX
243
XXX
260
XXXI
270
XXXII
281
XXXIII
290
XXXIV
295
XXXV
305
XLIV
384
XLV
397
XLVI
407
XLVII
425
XLVIII
437
XLIX
446
L
451
LI
491
LII
503
LIII
517
LIV
525
LV
530
LVI
535
LVII
541
LVIII
546
LIX
564
LX
593
LXI
596
LXII
608
LXIII
612
LXIV
619
LXV
621
LXVI
626
LXVII
639
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About the author (1940)

Franz Boas, a German-born American anthropologist, became the most influential anthropologist of his time. He left Germany because of its antiliberal and anti-Semitic climate. As a Columbia University professor for 37 years (1899-1936), he created both the field of anthropology and the modern concept of culture. Boas played a key role in organizing the American Anthropological Association (AAA) as an umbrella organization for the emerging field. At both Columbia and the AAA, Boas encouraged the "four field" concept of anthropology; he personally contributed to physical anthropology, linguistics, archaeology, as well as cultural anthropology. His work in these fields was pioneering. Both directly and through the influence of such students as Ruth Benedict, Melville J. Herskovits, Alfred L. Kroeber, and Margaret Mead, he set the agenda for all subsequent American cultural anthropology. In His lifetime Boas had many leadership roles including: Assistant curator at the American Museum of Natural History; editor of The Journal of American Folklore; president of the New York Academy of Sciences, and founder of the International Journal of American Linguistics. Boas is the author of hundreds of scientific monographs and articles. He died in 1942.

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