A SOUTHERN RECORD THE HISTORY OF THE THIRD REGIMENT LOUSIANA INFANTRY.

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Page 162 - How sleep the Brave who sink to rest By all their country's wishes blest! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod. By fairy hands their knell is rung; By forms unseen their dirge is sung; There Honor comes, a pilgrim gray, To bless the turf that wraps their clay; And Freedom shall awhile repair, To dwell a weeping hermit there!
Page 23 - Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, was chosen President, and Alexander H. Stephens, of Georgia, Vice-President, of this confederation.
Page 256 - By the struggling moonbeam's misty light, And the lantern dimly burning. No useless coffin enclosed his breast, Nor in sheet nor in shroud we bound him, . .', But he lay like a warrior taking his rest, With his martial cloak around him.
Page 345 - ... take care that none who owe service in the field shall be sheltered at home from the disgrace of having . deserted their duty to their families, to their country, and to their God.
Page 75 - ... but still our gallant Southerners pushed onward, and with one wild yell broke upon the enemy, pushing them back and strewing the ground with their dead. Nothing could withstand the impetuosity of our final charge. The enemy fled, and could not again be rallied, and they were seen at 12m. fast retreating among the hills in the distance. Thus ended the battle. It lasted six hours and a half.
Page 239 - ... in order to be protected during the approaching day's combat. Rations, at this period, were plentiful, and were distributed to the men, already prepared, by details made for this purpose. General Grant sent in a flag of truce, asking permission to bury his dead, which were lying unburied in thick profusion outside of the intrenchments, where the enemy had assaulted the lines. General Pemberton refused to grant the request, replying that the battle was not yet decided. The Federal trains and troops...
Page 277 - ... parole under oath. That I will not take up arms again against the United States, nor serve in any military, police, or constabulary force in any Fort, Garrison or field work, held by the Confederate States of America, against the United States...
Page 149 - Huutsville road, and a portion of McCulloch's division, which had joined me during the night, in position to follow, while I so disposed of my remaining forces as best to deceive the enemy as to my intention, and to hold him in check while executing it.
Page 75 - Reid's battery was ordered to move forward, and the Louisiana regiment was again called into action on the left of it. The battle then became general, and probably no two opposing forces ever fought with greater desperation. Inch by inch the enemy gave way and were driven from their position. Totten's battery fell back. Missourians, Arkansans, Louisianians and Texans pushed forward.
Page 75 - The incessant roll of musketry was deafening, and the balls fell as thick as hailstones ; but still our gallant Southerners pushed onward, and with one wild yell broke upon the enemy, pushing them back and strewing the ground with their dead. Nothing could withstand the impetuosity of our final charge ; the enemy fled, and could not again be rallied, and they were seen, at 12 M., last retreating among the hills in the distance.

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