Episodes of French History: During the Consulate and the First Empire

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Harper, 1859 - France - 361 pages
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Page 15 - No, sire," replied M. d'Aubesson, one of his chamberlains, celebrated for his antiquarian researches; " such a pretension is altogether unfounded, as all is mere fable regarding the Electoral House of Wurtemberg, beyond the eleventh century. Its recognized founder, Conrad II., was the ancestor of a line of princes who were equally distinguished as rulers and as warriors ; but it was only towards the close of the fifteenth century that the Countship of Wurtemberg was erected into a duchy by the Emperor...
Page 363 - Mrs. GASKELL, Miss MULOCH, and other prominent English writers. The larger portion of the Magazine has, however, been devoted to articles upon American topics, furnished by American writers. Contributions have been welcomed from every section of the country ; and in deciding upon their acceptance the Editors have aimed to be governed solely by the intrinsic merits of the articles, irrespective of their authorship. Care has been taken that the Magazine should never become the organ of any local clique...
Page 81 - Napoleon utter a more original truth than when he said, that there is but one step from the sublime to the ridiculous...
Page 44 - Magnificent fgtes at the house of M. de Talleyrand — At the house of Madame de Montesson — At that of the minister of the interior on the anniversary of the battle of Marengo — Departure of Their Majesties. TN May, 1801, the Prince of Tuscany, Don Louis I., •*- whom the First Consul had just made King of Etruria, arrived in Paris to go from there into his new kingdom. He travelled under the name of the Count of Leghorn, with his wife, the Infanta of Spain, Marie Louise, third daughter of...
Page 21 - It was then a woman whom I was about to launch into eternity ! Oh, monseigneur, you would have pitied even me at that moment — a woman who, for aught I could tell, might be guiltless of all crime, and the mere victim of another's hate. Vainly, however, did I protest and entreat ; I was compelled to yield to a force which I was unable to resist — the sin was heavy on my soul, but I had no alternative. My sword was placed in my hand ; a black veil was thrown over my head ; and I was forced onward...
Page 23 - ... added one of my companions, " the very attempt will prove your own destruction, as well as that of those to whom you have been rash enough to confide your secret." With this assurance the strangers drove off, leaving me standing in the road. I waited a short time, listening to the sound of the receding wheels ; and then, as it died away in the distance, I withdrew the handkerchief, and joyfully crossed the threshold of my own home.
Page 43 - I therefore ofl'er no opinion as to the guilt or innocence of Frederic William ; nor shall I even permit myself to express my sense of the extent to which such an act of retribution would have been justifiable or unjustifiable on his part. I have merely been relating to you a .story which was not, as I conceived, without a certain amount of interest. I have given it to you as it was told to me ; and I need not point out its moral. But I have unwittingly permitted my tale to intrude too far into the...
Page 25 - Madame," interposed Napoleon, impressively, " I am about to conclude my tale, and perhaps to give yon the key to it. Such events as that which I have just related are more common in the history of courts than the uninitiated would apprehend ; and, unfortunately, the fact is never known until the evil is beyond remedy." "Good heavens, Bonaparte ! "Why do you tell us such horrid stories, and compel us to believe them ?" exclaimed the agitated Josephine. " Are you endeavoring to frighten us to death...
Page 20 - ... event which had just taken place, my life would be the forfeit of her indiscretion, than the horses were urged into a gallop ; and, powerless as a child, I could only offer up a silent prayer for protection and support. I could not form the faintest idea of the direction in which we were traveling ; I could only calculate that the journey occupied eighteen or twenty hours. At its close I was lifted out of the carriage with the same precaution as I had been placed in it ; and then, each of my...
Page 25 - Diedrich was no sooner alone than he placed this extraordinary document undercover, and despatched it by a courier to the Baron de Breteuil, who was at that period Prime Minister. A fortnight elapsed ere he received any reply ; but at the end of that time a packet was delivered to him by the Governor of Strasbourg, which contained these words : ' Sir, I have submitted to His Majesty the communication which you addressed to me, and I have been honored by the command of the King, to express his desire...

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