Missions and Empire

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Norman Etherington
OUP Oxford, Jul 14, 2005 - History - 352 pages
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The explosive expansion of Christianity in Africa and Asia during the last two centuries constitutes one of the most remarkable cultural transformations in the history of mankind. Because it coincided with the spread of European economic and political hegemony, it tends to be taken for granted that Christian missions went hand in hand with imperialism and colonial conquest. In this book historians survey the relationship between Christian missions and the British Empire from the seventeenth century to the 1960s and treat the subject thematically, rather than regionally or chronologically. Many of these themes are treated at length for the first time, relating the work of missions to language, medicine, anthropology, and decolonization. Other important chapters focus on the difficult relationship between missionaries and white settlers, women and mission, and the neglected role of the indigenous evangelists who did far more than European or North American missionaries to spread the Christian religion - belying the image of Christianity as the 'white man's religion'.
 

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Contents

The Christianizing of British America
19
An Overview 17oo1914
40
Humanitarians and White Settlers in the Nineteenth Century
64
Where the Missionary Frontier Ran Ahead of Empire
86
Christian Missions and the Raj
107
New Christians as Evangelists
132
Missionaries Converts
153
Women and Cultural Exchanges
173
1o Language
194
New Religious Movements
216
Anthropology
238
Education and Medicine
261
Decolonization
285
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About the author (2005)

Norman Etherington recieved his BA and PhD degrees from Yale University. He joined the History Department at the University of Adelaide as a Lecturer in 1968 and was subsequently appointed Reader in History. In 1989 he moved to the University of Western Australia taking up the position of Professor and Chair of History. He is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, a past President of the Australian Historical Association, a Member of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), a Member of the International Association for mission studies, and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society of Great Britain.

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